Physician

(redirected from primary care physician)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

PHYSICIAN. One lawfully engaged in the practice of medicine.
     2. A physician in England cannot recover for fees, as his practice is altogether honorary. Peake C. N. P. 96, 123; 4 T. R. 317.
     3. But in Pennsylvania, and perhaps in all the United States, he may recover for his services. 5 Serg. & Rawle, 416. The law implies, therefore, a contract on the part of a medical man, as well as those of other professions, to discharge their duty in a skillful and attentive manner; and the law will redress the party injured by their neglect or ignorance. 1 Saund. 312, R; 1 Ld. Raym. 213; 2 Wils. 359; 8 East, 348.
     4. They are sometimes answerable criminally for mala praxis. (q.v.) 2 Russ. on Cr. 288; Ayl. Pand. 213; Com. Dig. h.t. Vin. Ab. h.t.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the researchers' fully adjusted models, an increase of 10 primary care physicians per 100,000 population was associated with a 51.5-day increase in life expectancy (95% CI, 29.5-73.5 days; 0.2% increase).
In the case of primary care physicians, respondents were asked to determine revenue from direct admissions, procedures performed and lab tests.
The dynamics of the patient pull for the primary care physician to become "handmaiden" to the patient, acquiescing to her demands for tests and treatment.
With ever more data demonstrating that patient-centered medical homes are the core of successful accountable care organizations, it's becoming clear that primary care physicians can have a meaningful role in the ACO movement.
THE DEFENSE The primary care physician claimed that the patient's injuries resulted solely from negligence on the part of the clinic staff.
"The primary care physician shortage is not a new problem," Dr.
Presumably, the successful primary care physician would visit hospitalized patients less and less as he becomes more and more successful in practicing preventive medicine and early detection of certain illnesses.
While a POS plan lets you go out of network, you'll have to pay most of the cost, unless your primary care physician refers you to an out-of-network doctor.
In the last decade, psychiatric researchers have reported that primary care physicians fail to detect depression in about two- thirds of their patients grappling with various forms of the disorder.
No differences were found in treatment level with respect to age, gender, race, disease severity or comorbidities on multivariate analysis, but patients comanaged by a primary care physician and a pulmonologist were more likely to receive an appropriate level of care, as compared to patients treated by a primary care physician (odds ratio, 4.6), said Dr.

Full browser ?