Printing

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PRINTING. The art of impressing letters; the art of making books or papers by impressing legible characters.
     2. The right to print is guaranteed by law, and the abuse of the right renders the guilty person liable to punishment. See Libel,; Liberty of the Press; Press.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
In the preface Caxton tells us how, after he had printed some other books, many gentlemen came to him to ask him why he did not print a history of King Arthur, "which ought most to be remembered among us Englishmen afore all the Christian kings; to whom I answered that diverse men hold opinion that there was no such Arthur, and all such books as be made of him be but fained matters and fables."
The same evening I was in my room alone, designing the new print, when there came a knock at the door, and Gentleman Jones walked in.
The poet blushed again, and said: "I do not think that can be the case, for my verses have never been printed."
For a good many years, during the period in which our author remained in seclusion, much that appeared in print in America concerning Melville came from the pen of Mr.
"One of the things," here observed Don Quixote, "that ought to give most pleasure to a virtuous and eminent man is to find himself in his lifetime in print and in type, familiar in people's mouths with a good name; I say with a good name, for if it be the opposite, then there is no death to be compared to it."
To supply the large demand for copies he investigated and mastered the new art by which they might be so wonderfully multiplied and about 1475, at fifty years of age, set up a press at Bruges in the modern Belgium, where he issued his 'Recueil,' which was thus the first English book ever put into print. During the next year, 1476, just a century before the first theater was to be built in London, Caxton returned to England and established his shop in Westminster, then a London suburb.
But then, to think that Satan should take human shape upon him in such a place, where there could be no manner of occasion for it, but to leave the print of his foot behind him, and that even for no purpose too, for he could not be sure I should see it - this was an amusement the other way.
I have a prejudice against people who print things in a foreign language and add no translation.
"I bought 'em so I could print a bit of a letter to mother of a Sunday.
In its printed form, thought is more imperishable than ever; it is volatile, irresistible, indestructible.
His collection is interesting and important, not only as the parent source or foundation of the earlier printed versions of Aesop, but as the direct channel of attracting to these fables the attention of the learned.
The duke went down into his carpet- bag, and fetched up a lot of little printed bills and read them out loud.