Profanity


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Profanity

Irreverence towards sacred things; particularly, an irreverent or blasphemous use of the name of God. Vulgar, irreverent, or coarse language.

The use of certain profane or obscene language on the radio or television is a federal offense, but in other situations, profanity might fall within the protection of the constitutional guarantee of Freedom of Speech.

References in periodicals archive ?
In July, Reggae Sumfest's Dancehall Night was halted by police due to profanity during the performance of one of the singers and in the past the Trinidad-born US-based hip hop artiste Nicki Minaj was fined for using profanity on stage during her performance.
Russell later told the administrative judge that the hearing judge had used profanity when speaking to a citizen in court.
According to her, profanity is not her style and she wouldn't write songs her mom and kids wouldn't be proud of.
For the study, the team analysed the lyrics of more than 400 top Billboard songs for themes of violence, profanity, misogyny and gender-role references.
Authored by Councilor Lilia Farinas, the "Anti-Profanity Ban" prohibits swearing, cussing, and other forms of profanity in selected institutions in the city.
In an article, "Remember profanity isn't always protected speech," Hudson explains that, among other restrictions, lawmakers can also illegalize profanity when it's used to "stir up a crowd to immediate lawless action."
Concerned group spoke out against the profanity and lack of censorship, but in America where freedom of speech is often used as an excuse or justification for offensive language, it was not easy to pull back the crazy horses into their stables so to speak.
In other words, there's a certain four-letter word that rhymes with "luck," but since it's a profanity it's best not to repeat it here in print.
However, some artists are using profanity in their lyrics.
But the controversy over the word President Trump is said to have used in describing distressed countries whose immigrants he considers undesirable does offer the opportunity to reflect on profanity and the efforts a news organization appealing to a universal audience makes to address it.
Such experiences are explained in Michael Adams' In Praise of Profanity. The book's argument is not that we should use more profanity.
Based on surveys of what people in several Western nations regard as unacceptable, the author divides profanity into four categories: praying (using names of religious figures and religious words, such as holy and damn, in secular ways), fornicating (the F-word and other terms for the sex act and genitals), excreting (everything related to bodily functions, from feces to vomit) and slurring (offensive words for groups based on ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation and so on).