Client

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Client

A person who employs or retains an attorney to represent him or her in any legal business; to assist, to counsel, and to defend the individual in legal proceedings; and to appear on his or her behalf in court.

This term includes a person who divulges confidential matters to an attorney while pursuing professional assistance, regardless of sub-sequent employment of the attorney. This attorney-client relationship is quite complex and extensive in its scope. One of the key aspects of this relationship is confidentiality of communications. A client has the right to require that his or her attorney keep secret any discussion between them during the course of their relationship that pertains to the matters for which the attorney is hired. This protection extends to a person who might have disclosed any confidential matters while seeking aid from an attorney, whether the attorney was employed or not. If, for example, someone is "shopping" for an attorney to handle a Divorce, the person might reveal certain private information to several attorneys, all of whom are expected to keep such communications confidential.

Cross-references

Attorney-Client Privilege.

CLIENT, practice. One who employs and retains an attorney or counsellor to manage or defend a suit or action in which he is a party, or to advise him about some legal matters.
     2. The duties of the client towards his counsel are, 1st. to give him a written authority, 1 Ch. Pr. 19; 2. to disclose his case with perfect candor3. to offer spontaneously, advances of money to his attorney; 2 Ch. Pr. 27; 4. he should, at the end of the suit, promptly pay his attorney his fees. Ib. His rights are, 1. to be diligently served in the management of his business 2. to be informed of its progress and, 3. that his counsel shall not disclose what has been professionally confided to him. See Attorney at law; Confidential communication.

References in periodicals archive ?
$5.8 million from Canada's Ontario Affordable Housing Program; $3.86 million in grant funding from the Region of Peel; the City of Brampton contributed another $2.4 million in development fee exemptions and land.
Consider the demographic and economic characteristics of the student population to determine if a program is feasible, how much aid can be guaranteed, and how effective the program will be.
One of the problems that MRS was experiencing during the 1990's was a lack of stability in their ability to staff the program evaluation function of the agency.
The InnerChange program was given the prison's "honor unit," which had been used to house the best-behaved inmates.
This program is actually like a recruitment tool through the families for our camp.
Columbia says net program benefits represent the results of one business challenge the company deals with successfully using knowledge the executive gained while attending the program while program costs are one-twelfth of the attendee's salary, plus travel expenses and program fees.
Last year, 10,000 of the Blues plan's members got paid for signing up with its work-site wellness programs, including its Blue Ribbon Personal Edge program that provides financial incentives to employees who participate in key components of the MyBlueHealth wellness online activities.
In 1976 Sembler and Zappala founded a program virtually identical to The Seed, staffed by former Seed parents and participants (including some who had become Seed staffers).
When faced with high-profile program manager openings, organizations often promote individuals from within the project manager ranks, for very good reasons: They are familiar with the organization and have outstanding technical project management skills.
(2) In the years that followed, as more pregnant women became eligible for services through First Steps, program expenses increased.
Since implementing the Day Spring Program, we have only had to discharge one participant, who became a wandering risk.
To assess teacher and teacher education program performance, states need to develop longitudinal data collection systems in order to follow each student's academic progress and link it to the school from which the student's teacher graduated.