proles


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See: offspring

PROLES. Progeny, such issue as proceeds from a lawful marriage; and, in its enlarged sense, it signifies any children.

References in periodicals archive ?
But she continued to receive a "large number" of messages from Cotterill, who had set up fake Facebook prole to send messages to her and her adult children.
"I hope to make you happy and enjoy life," his prole reads.
1061, [seccion] 1): <<"fides" et "proles" possunt dupliciter consideran.
And was Big Brother any better at keeping an eye on the Proles than our security services are at surveying our every move today?
Winston wrote, "If there is hope it lies in the proles" (69).
Listening to conservative intellectual acquaintances gushing over the Tea Party movement, I hear Winston Smith's diary entry murmured in the background: "If there is hope, it lies in the proles."
Segal and Halprin's gesture toward democratic inclusiveness merely accentuates the radical gulf that separates the patrician leader who wields real power in the White House from the plebes and proles. Halprin's book reveals that Segal wrapped his models from head to foot in bandages, before covering them in plaster molds, which were later used to caste the bronze statues.
Alton Towers call it a VIP ticket - which presumably stands for Very Insulting to Proles.
First century plebes got bread and circuses; 21st century proles may get lotteries and drugs.
He said: "From dogs who have social media proles to owners who use video calling to check on their pet while away, technology is fast becoming an integral part of everyday life."
Figures from Local Alcohol Proles for England show that both men and women cut their lives hort by booze-related deaths.
In a world where r cheap entertainment keeps the proles r ignorant but content, where r war without end is always a fought and the goveo rnment is always a watching, can Winston possibly hold on to what he feels inside?