proof of facts

See: evidence
References in periodicals archive ?
Among their topics are philosophy and the ontologies of knowledge representation in artificial intelligence, the discipline of ontological engineering, embracing the formal revolution in applied ontology: Guarino's impact, formal ontology to the proof of facts, and towards a logical foundation of reification in modeling languages.
As lawyers, the Secretary stressed they "should be the first to show proof of facts before making reckless public statements," Gueverra pointed out.
Of all people, they as lawyers, should be the first to show proof of facts before making reckless public statements,' Guevarra said told reporters.
1919) ("The failure of the defendant and of his son to testify although present in court was not equivalent to affirmative proof of facts necessary to maintain the action.").
Above all, the current domestic cricket crisis has aroused the suspicion of the general public with bitter disappointment on substantial proof of facts and figures as to whether "Cricket is still a gentleman's game?"
1919) ("[T]he failure of the defendant and his son to testify although present in court was not equivalent to affirmative proof of facts necessary to maintain the action.").
For a complete definition of reasonableness as it applies to noncompete agreements, see Unreasonableness of Covenant Not To Compete, 20 AmJur Proof of Facts 3d 705, [section] 3:
Fraudulent inducement is an independent tort in that it requires proof of facts separate and distinct from the breach of contract.
It also carries full text of all related articles from "Am Jur Proof of Facts," "Am Jur Trials" and "ALR Annotations." The new CD costs $49.
"Submitted to the proof of facts," as found in the archives, such "a priori" images lose their power as predictors of female behavior.
The Anglo-American law of evidence may have anticipated the probabilistic transformation of contemporary social and political life.(12) For quite some time - at least for 100 years and, if Professor Barbara Shapiro(13) is right, for at least 200 years - the governing assumption of this body of law has been that all or practically all facts are uncertain and that proof of facts is always or almost always a matter of probabilities.(14) Legal scholarship has also long emphasized the probabilistic nature of judicial proof.(15) In recent years scholarly interest in the topic of uncertain forensic proof has intensified.