propound

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Propound

To offer or propose. To form or put forward an item, plan, or idea for discussion and ultimate acceptance or rejection.

propound

verb advance, advocate, allege, argue, aver, contend, exhibit, hypothesize, introduce, lay before, maintain, make a motion, moot, move, offer, pose, posit, postulate, predicate, present, proffer, project, propose, put forth, put forward, recommend, set forth, submit, suggest, tender, throw out, voice
Associated concepts: propound the law
See also: adduce, admonish, advise, advocate, allege, annunciate, argue, assert, avouch, avow, bear, claim, decide, defend, give, hold, issue, maintain, offer, posit, postulate, proffer, propose, publish, submit, utter

TO PROPOUND. To offer, to propose; as, the onus probandi in every case lies upon the party who propounds a will. 1 Curt. R. 637; 6 Eng. Eccl. R. 417.

References in periodicals archive ?
That kind of instrumentalism would not satisfy the most serious propounders of normative models, who are the focus of this essay.
Collins sets out to challenge the standard account of the reception of Eliot's work in which the central problem is seen to be the disparity between the 'imagined' or implied author, a gentle and wise upholder of Christian morality, and the 'real' author, the radical propounder through essays and translations of what one contemporary critic called' the godless humanitarianism of Strauss and Feuerbach' (P.
D) a propounder of the rasa school of Sanskrit poetics defines katha in terms of his general definition of poetry as a statement the essence of which is rasa.
At Uppercross, she emerges as the novel's traveller-lecteur, propounder of her own destiny.
Buddhasiras, who was evidently a figure of particular renown, is in some of the inscriptions entitled dharmakathika or mahadharmakathika '(great) propounder of the dharma.
Rehmat Ali, two foremost propounders of the Pakistan philosophy.
It has become an organic and effective global dialogue centre between propounders of major world religions," he said.
The propounders of human rights, on the other hand, argue that human rights abuses are often justified through cultural relativistic arguments, and that, although it is necessary to pay attention to various socioeconomic and cultural circumstances, it is also essential to have universal notions of political, social, and economic rights to protect the basic wellbeing of humans (Afkhami 2001; Ishay 2004, 11 -12).
One thing on which the propounders of First Amendment jurisprudence perhaps agree is the influence of truth theory derived from the writings of John Milton and John Stuart Mill.
The collection of essays is chronological and transnational, including studies on some of the original propounders of art for art's sake--Theophile Gautier, Charles Baudelaire, Joris-Karl Huysmans, Walter Pater, and Oscar Wilde--their early followers, and the resurgence of Aestheticism in the twentieth century in the works of Theodor Adorno, Roland Barthes, Wolfgang Iser, and Susan Sontag.
He quoted the American historian George Bancroft and the English philosopher John Locke, in support of his contention; Locke had pointed out that the "Baptists were the first propounders of absolute liberty, just and true liberty, equal and impartial liberty.