proprietor

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proprietor

n. the owner of anything, but particularly the owner of a business operated by that individual.

proprietor

noun dominus, householder, landlord, landowner, manager, master, owner, possessor, proprietary
See also: director, employer, landholder, landlord, landowner, principal, tenant

PROPRIETOR. The owner. (q.v.)

References in periodicals archive ?
The ministry urged owners of sole proprietorships and commercial companies to cancel or renew their expired CRs till March 31, 2018 to ensure accuracy of their establishments' data.
23 (ONA) The Ministry of Commerce and Industry pointed out that the number of sole proprietorship and commercial companies that have renewed or cancelled their expired Commercial Registrations (CRs) through Invest Easy Portal stood at 3062 since starting submitting the application at the beginning of December 2017.
LLC entities have limited liability (like corporations), but may be taxed as sole proprietorships (for which income and expenses flow through to the owner to be taxed), if they are owned by a single, individual member.
A limited liability company (see Chapter 15) with a single owner may choose to be taxed as either a sole proprietorship or as a C Corporation (see Chapter 13).
7 percent of the nation's net profits from sole proprietorships in 2005.
The conversion of a sole proprietorship into an LLC may result in the former proprietor recognizing income, due to required loss recapture under the at-risk rules.
In tax year 2001, there was wide variability in the expenses of sole proprietorships by business characteristics such as gross receipts, industry category, businesses with inventories, and businesses with home offices.
West Hollywood, for example, exempts all home-based sole proprietorships with no employees from business taxes, said David Hatcher, revenue manager for the city.
Many proprietorships are on the cash basis, allowing them even greater smoothing flexibility since they may artificially postpone or accelerate revenues and expenses at year end.
5) Small businesses were most commonly organized as sole proprietorships, which accounted for more than 40 percent of firms; about 30 percent were organized as C corporations, 20 percent as S corporations, and the remainder as partnerships.
He explains the legal and tax characteristics of all types of business entities, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, LLCs, and corporations, as well as the limited partnership, the registered limited liability partnership, and S corporations; personal liability issues; how to form and manage each of the business entities; how each deals with profits, losses, investments, and taxes; how doing business out of state may affect the choice of entity; how to convert a sole proprietorship, partnership, LLC, or corporation; and examples of different conversion scenarios.