prorogation


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Prorogation

Prolonging or putting off to another day. The discontinuation or termination of a session of the legislature, parliament, or the like. In English Law, a prorogation is the Continuance of the parliament from one session to another, as an adjournment is a continuation of the session from day to day. In Civil Law, giving time to do a thing beyond the term previously fixed.

prorogation

1 an agreement to accept the jurisdiction of a given court.
2 the exercise of the ROYAL PREROGATIVE ending a session of Parliament.

PROROGATION. To put off to another time. It is generally applied to the English parliament, and means the continuance of it from one day to another; it differs from adjournment, which is a continuance of it from one day to another in the same session. 1 Bl. Com. 186.
     2. In the civil law, prorogation signifies the time given to do a thing beyond the term prefixed. Dig. 2, 14, 27, 1. See Prolongation.

References in periodicals archive ?
Lord Doherty added: "I do not accept the submission that the prorogation contravenes the rule of law."
The judge told the court that he had received notice from the Supreme Court of its intent to examine the outcome of the Scottish and English challenges against prorogation on September 17.
Labour MP, Karen Lee (Lincoln), asked about asked about prorogation of Parliament.
In particular, Lord Doherty indicated that even if prorogation was within the scope of the courts, political judgments would be relevant considerations as a matter of law."
Raymond McCord's lawyers will urge a High Court judge to convene a hearing later in the week on an application to injunct prorogation.
"The prorogation of Parliament deprives MPs of the opportunity to properly scrutinise the UK Government, and to legislate the terms on which the UK leaves the EU should they wish.
"It will do lasting and catastrophic damage to the major parties in this country and I think this political generation won't be forgiven for failing to honour that promise." Businesswoman Ms Miller previously successfully took the Government to court over the triggering of Article 50 to start the Brexit process, and Sir John said he wanted to join her case "in view of the imminence of prorogation".
Leading Brexiteer Mr Rees-Moggs hit back at critics, insisting the prorogation move was not intended to limit the time available for MPs to debate Brexit but will allow the Government to tackle other issues.
Firstly, Johnson is acting within his powers in asking the queen for a prorogation. What's more, such a move is not unusual given that he has already laid down the key areas where his government will direct its focus and action, and the UK is entering a new phase outside the EU, be that with or without a deal.
ENPNewswire-August 30, 2019--University College London: Analysis: Prorogation is an 'abuse of executive power' says UCL's Constitution Unit
In a statement, the opposition leaders said: "It is our view that there is a majority in the House of Commons that does not support this prorogation, and we demand that the Prime Minister reverses this decision immediately or allows MPs to vote on whether there should be one."
Conservatives like Jacob Rees-Mogg and chairman James Cleverly say that prorogation is completely normal, and any new Government is entitled to do it.