proscriptive


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References in periodicals archive ?
Bradford's Law does not provide a proscriptive formula: journals can be moved in and out of Zone 1 to make the map fit the pattern.
There are two leading accounts of fiduciary loyalty in this sense: proscriptive accounts and prescriptive accounts.
These practitioners would be free to innovate, iterate, and otherwise define their nascent profession in a flexible environment, unhampered by overly proscriptive rules and requirements but made safe through transparency and crowd-sourced assessment.
Quakers, also known as the Religious Society of Friends, are not proscriptive while George Cadbury belonged to the Temperance Movement of the day believing alcohol was dangerous to the health of the person, family and society at large.
In the past year we had had time to reflect on the first round of constitutional changes, and those involved in the drafting of the new texts were able to explain why in some instances the provisions were not proscriptive as to how certain of their requirements were to be achieved, instead leaving an element of discretion and flexibility about matters of implementation.
Despite their proscriptive moniker, SEPs are not a uniform or clearly identifiable category of patent.
It eliminates the proscriptive, one-size-fits-all approach of No Child Left Behind and includes expanding access to high-quality preschool, which is the best investment we as a nation can make.
The government programs are very proscriptive and can represent a lot of work just to apply to a program like the MSSP, Pioneer, or Next Generation ACO program.
Still, if her approach is ultimately more descriptive than proscriptive, this is an important and intrepid book that raises and questions the assumptions supporting these most awesome of weapons.
29) Although the Court acknowledged that constitutional violations might arise from a deterrent effect associated with governmental action, (30) it distinguished Laird from justiciable cases (31) in which the complainants were subject to "regulatory, proscriptive, or compulsory" governmental action.
21 defines the period for which an entity will continue as a going concern to be the same period required to be used by management in its going-concern assessment or, in the absence of proscriptive guidance, one year after the balance sheet date.