protestant


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
References in periodicals archive ?
(8) See Frank Wright, "Reconciling the Histories of Protestant and Catholic in Northern Ireland," in Falconer, ed., Reconciling Memories, 68-83; and Micheal D.
When Ireland became independent of Britain in 1922, the British retained control over Northern Ireland, where Protestant sympathizers were the majority.
Huntington's 1996 The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (Simon & Schuster)--a paragraph-long analogy between the Islamic fundamentalist movement and the Protestant Reformation: "Both are reactions to the stagnation and corruption of existing institutions; advocate a return to a purer and more demanding form of their religion; preach work, order, and discipline."
Being Mexican-American and a Protestant emerged as profoundly significant life experiences and aspects of my self-understanding as well as my understanding of the world around me.
The residents agreed to a silent demonstration as a mark of respect for a Protestant boy killed in another flashpoint area of north Belfast.
One wonders if there has been more of an expansion through diversification than a shift in Protestant image-making.
Almost immediately, the Republican House leaders, both of whom are evangelical Protestants, came under fire for passing over the Catholic priest and choosing a Protestant minister.
Clearly the two chapters that are closest to Raboteau's heart are "Minority within a Minority: The History of Black Catholics in America" and "A Hidden Wholeness: Thomas Merton and Martin Luther King, Jr." Raboteau, who "had wanted to be a priest," sets out to reclaim black Catholic history and demonstrate how this "minority within a minority" has had "profound implications for the religious and racial identities of black Catholics in the United States." In the Western hemispheric context, one is more likely to be black and Catholic; in the United States, one is more likely to be black and Protestant. Black Catholics trace their origins back to "free persons of color" in Louisiana, often with Caribbean roots; Maryland; pockets in Kentucky; and Mississippi.
Prof Byrne has studied thirty-five Protestant and Catholic schoolchildren between the ages of eleven and sixteen attending mixed and single denomination schools.
Thousands of letters poured in, from catholic, protestant, and integrated schools across Northern Ireland.
From the time of the Reformation until about a half century ago, Protestant church leaders and scholars of Protestant religion relegated mysticism to Catholicism and the Middle Ages, denying any place for it in their new Christianity.
Between 1990 and 2017, the proportion of the population aged 16 and over who reported as Protestant decreased by 14 percentage points from 56% to 42%, while the proportion who reported as Catholic increased by three percentage points from 38% to 41%.