prove

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prove

v. to present evidence and/or logic that makes a fact seem certain. What a party must do to convince a trier of fact (judge or jury without a judge) as to facts claimed and to win a lawsuit or criminal case. (See: proof)

prove

verb ascertain, ascertain as truth, confirm, corroborate, declarare, demonstrate, establish as truth, establish the genuineness of, essablish the validity of, evince, manifest, ostendere, probare, put to the proof, put to the test, show, show clearly, substantiate, support, uphold, validate, verify
Foreign phrases: In rebus manifestis, errat qui auctoritates legum allegat; quia perspicua vera non sunt probanda.In clear cases, he makes mistakes who cites legal authorities; for obvious truths are not to be proved.
See also: adduce, ascertain, bear, cite, confirm, convince, corroborate, demonstrate, disabuse, document, establish, evince, manifest, persuade, reason, show, state, substantiate, support, sustain, testify, validate, verify
References in periodicals archive ?
There are many different methods and devices available that can be used to prove the natural gas meter.
They can be used to calibrate a master meter which can then be used to prove other devices at higher pressures and higher flows.
During the prove, the volume of both the calibrated master meter and the field meter being proved can be measured precisely during the prove cycle, using pulse interpolation as described in API Chapter 4, Section 6 Pulse Interpolation.
It can measure the gas being purchased and it can be used to prove all the high pressure meters used downstream in the distribution system.
Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit ruled that, based on the conflicting and implausible statements of the defendant at the border and at trial, there was sufficient evidence to prove that the defendant knowingly possessed with the intent to distribute the marijuana.
He appealed his conviction claiming that the evidence was insufficient to prove that he knew marijuana was in the vehicle he was driving.
In order for the government to prove knowledge when a defendant deliberately avoids finding out whether a vehicle or package contains illegal drugs, the government must prove that the defendant was aware of a high probability that he possessed a prohibited drug and deliberately avoided learning the truth.
Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit ruled that there was sufficient evidence to prove that all three defendants knew the drugs were hidden in the vehicle.
While knowledge of the relationships between subjects and TPIs can help negotiators use these individuals to the greatest operational advantage, determining TPIs' willingness to cooperate and work with law enforcement authorities proves paramount to successful negotiations.
While similar to telephone contact, voice contact from behind cover proves less desirable, yet remains an acceptable method.
The formalized meeting method proves effective in situations involving groups of subjects, especially during prison uprisings and domestic terrorist confrontations.
We may prove Godel's second incompleteness theorem, as well as the theorem that the second incompleteness theorem is provable in the theory ("the formalized second incompleteness theorem"), as follows.