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prove

v. to present evidence and/or logic that makes a fact seem certain. What a party must do to convince a trier of fact (judge or jury without a judge) as to facts claimed and to win a lawsuit or criminal case. (See: proof)

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References in periodicals archive ?
274(e)(3).This, in turn, proves that the trucking company was "the person who actually [bore] the expense" within the meaning of Kegs.
While this requires a great deal of training initially, it proves beneficial when it comes to providing homeland security.
Nevertheless, the general nature of how well the pellets dissolve follows a positive correlation with the flow rate of molten iron and proves that the Zr dissolution rate and recovery can be predicted.
If Campath proves to dramatically control MS, the trade-off might be obvious, but this is a significant consideration.
(And the trial which works, which proves an immune-based treatment by clinical endpoints, must also happen to include a candidate surrogate marker which also works and is otherwise satisfactory, in order to establish that marker for more rapid approvals of similar treatments in the future.
Evidence -- information that proves or disproves disputed facts.
"The MTC thinks this effectively proves the existence of a nexus."
Formulated by Lund, Szegedy, Rajeev Motwani of Stanford University, and Sanjeev Arora and Madhu Sudan, both students at Berkeley, the latest result proves that for a significant group of such hard optimization problems, one cannot guarantee finding even an approximate answer within a reasonable time.
When beginning the process, the choice of the right accreditation manager (or, perhaps, in the case of a large agency, an accreditation staff) proves vital to the agency's success; this person should demonstrate commitment to the project, attention to detail, an ability to work independently, and a positive relationship with the agency's CEO.
If Rebif proves to have clear advantages over Avonex, the data will be submitted to the FDA in the hope of getting permission to market it in the U.S.
Because data-mining software now proves userfriendly, personal-computer based, and, thus, affordable, law enforcement agencies at all levels can use it to help effectively handle this increased flow of data.
Generating and appropriating the necessary financial resources throughout the state, an obstacle not faced by Project Exile officials, proves vital to the success of such a statewide initiative.