prudential

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Related to prudentially: call on, try out, dichotomising
References in periodicals archive ?
Market competition further expanded in 1993 with the emergence of non-authorising deposit-taking institutions (Non-ADI) that are not prudentially supervised, such as wholesale lenders and mortgage brokers.
They have to carefully and prudentially weigh their possibilities of response which is the reason why the Israelis never have to cease their relentless attacks of varying intensity.
Other inhibiting (and prudentially unnecessary) restrictions include:
In entering into a more vigorous and overtly political role, the bishops--and the attorneys advising them--need to formulate a morally and prudentially acceptable test to determine when circumstances dictate the intervention of the Church.
All financial institutions should be required to manage prudentially.
When viewed in isolation, the principle of separation of church and state serves religious liberty best when it is used prudentially not categorically.
45) According to DOS officials, they sometimes prudentially revoke visas (i.
Students who get straight A's have an ability to prudentially master their passions so they can achieve proficiency across a range of subjects.
Such a standard cannot be prudential, he argues, because it is circular to say that the objective requirement for wellbeing (the prudential value of a life) is that the life be truly prudentially valuable.
We have this (a) Description the Sanction or sepimentum legis [the fence of the law]: Namely the penalty or pain of the violation (b) of it which is punishment either expressed or determined as in some Law's or left undetermin'd to the arbitrium (c) iudicis [judgment of the judge] to infict prudentially under various degrees proportionable to the Circumstances of the Offence or contempt as is (d) in other Laws;
Prudentially, the instrumental benefit of giving to animals has serious limitations.
He emphasized the need for policy measures that apply "more or less comprehensively to all uses of short-term wholesale funding, without regard to the form of the transactions or whether the borrower was a prudentially regulated institution.