public place


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public place

a phrase of varying signification around the ideas of a location and the potential for the public or a section of it to be there. So despite this use of apparently plain English, it is often necessary to carry out some degree of legal analysis before being able to arrive at a meaning. The statutory context and the statutory purpose are likely to be influential. See e.g. PROSTITUTES' CARDS, CURFEW. Some statutes deal with the generality by requiring the locus to be specified, as in a designated public place.
References in classic literature ?
No Female shall walk in any public place without continually keeping up her Peace-cry, under penalty of death.
AN Inoffensive Person walking in a public place was assaulted by a Stranger with a Club, and severely beaten.
The sight of the very great company of lords and ladies and fashionable persons who thronged the town, and appeared in every public place, filled George's truly British soul with intense delight.
for as to any real knowledge of a person's disposition that Bath, or any public place, can giveit is all nothing; there can be no knowledge.
de Treville, and permitted him to distribute furloughs for four days, on condition that the favored parties should not appear in any public place, under penalty of the Bastille.
Time was, when a poet sat upon a stool in a public place, and mused in the sight of men.
But that these should be hoarded up for the delight of their fellow-swine, and kept in a public place where any eyes may see them, is a disgrace to the English language in which they are written (though I hope few of these entries have been made by Englishmen), and a reproach to the English side, on which they are preserved.
All we have to do is just that to eliminate the trained-animal turn from all public places of entertainment.
He did not care to have Huck's company in public places.
When not engaged in reading Virgil, Homer, or Mistral, in parks, restaurants, streets, and suchlike public places, he indited sonnets (in French) to the eyes, ears, chin, hair, and other visible perfections of a nymph called Therese, the daughter, honesty compels me to state, of a certain Madame Leonore who kept a small cafe for sailors in one of the narrowest streets of the old town.
It is said that the student likes to appear on the street and in other public places in this kind of array, and that this predilection often keeps him out when exposure to rain or sun is a positive danger for him.
I cannot see that London has any great advantage over the country, for my part, except the shops and public places.

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