public use

public use

n. the only purpose for which private property can be taken (condemned) by the government under its power of eminent domain. Public use includes: schools, streets, highways, hospitals, government buildings, parks, water reservoirs, flood control, slum clearance and redevelopment, public housing, public theaters and stadiums, safety facilities, harbors, bridges, railroads, airports, terminals, prisons, jails, public utilities, canals, and numerous other purposes designated as beneficial to the public. (See: eminent domain, condemnation)

References in periodicals archive ?
Robertson's memo said in part: "The proposal involves land encompassing the entire northern slopes of the San Francisco Peaks and the Kachina Wilderness, where public use and access would be eliminated or sharply curtailed.
If the Government cannot guarantee the public use of these rights of way in the countryside how will it be able to give access to mountain, moorland etc?
The same was true of those that relied heavily on studio usage, and she wondered whether looking in at a Today show-type set from the sidewalk at people at desks is public use.
Canadians from coast to coast to coast are invited to offer their input and ideas as we look to find a new public use for 100 Wellington, an important heritage building facing Parliament Hill.
Around 3000MW to 4000MW of electricity would be saved if public uses electricity in a rightful manner instead of squandering it.
The travelling public uses public transport like the train to get from A to B and to participate in the social, economic and cultural life in their region or wider country.
Valarie Seliznov believes that high quality and fair price, makes Samand a suitable car for the Kazakhstanis, both for private and public uses.
Part one looks at the contributions of Kent Harold Richards and identifies advancements in and public uses of biblical scholarship.
shopping centers) rather than traditional public uses such as freeways and schools, would we want to ban such uses, restricting eminent domain to public uses (Proposition 98), or leave them untouched (Proposition 99)?
Under the public benefit conveyance (PBC) program, state or local governments and certain nonprofits can obtain surplus real property for public uses.
Currently, when a member of the public uses the Web site's Find a Lawyer function, only basic information is displayed, including the lawyer's address, that he or she is a member in good standing, year admitted, whether the lawyer is certified, and sections and committees membership.

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