puerility


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Related to puerility: stupefaction, concordantly, instilled

puerility

noun babyishness, boyishness, childlike, girlishness, infantilism
See also: adolescence, minority

PUERILITY, civil law. This commenced at the age of seven years, the end of the age of infancy, and lasted till the age of puberty, (q.v.) that is, in females till the accomplishment of twelve years, and in males, till the age of fourteen years fully accomplished. Ayl. Pand. 63.
     2. The ancient Roman lawyers divided puerility into proximus infantiae, as it approached infancy, and into proximus pubertati, as it became nearer to puberty. 6 Toullier, n. 100.

References in periodicals archive ?
A pioneering cross-cultural "panoramic view" of masculinity, according to the author, Gilmore's Manhood in the Making (1990) locates the puzzle of manhood in Kohutian terms, masculinity emerging as evaded regression to primordial symbiosis: "a hard-fought renunciation of the longing for the prelapsarian idyll of childhood," a defence "against puerility, against what is sometimes called the Peter Pan complex" (pp.
5, 1795), in 1 DHSC, supra note 2, at 776, 776 (noting that "reports of [Rutledge's] attachment to his bottle, his puerility, and extravagances, together with a variety of indecorums and imprudencies multiply daily"); see also John Rutledge, Vindicated: "A South Carolinean" to Benjamin Russell, COLUMBIAN CENTINEL, Aug.
Charlotte's mother, Frances Mary, made aware by Keble of the notable absence of suitable hymns for poor children-he accused Isaac Watts and Jane Taylor's work of puerility rather than simplicity--compiled The Child's Christian Year, and Charlotte acquired an extended family and new cultural horizons.
The situations are as diverse as William James and Julia Kristeva, Fintan O'Toole and Robert Frost, yet some common concerns emerge: Muldoon's "cryptic" qualities, from the hermetic connotation of that modifier to the gothic; sources of influence, even when influence theory is itself challenged; and the somewhat disturbing fact that a poet who was barely post-adolescent when Faber published his first book in 1973 has grown up, as Stephen Burr in "Thirteen or Fourteen" reminds us, without altogether giving up a well-polished pose of puerility.
at the center of the game lies innocence redressed with puerility and reinforced by malice," in Mapy Cortes's musical performances, "the inconveniences of the voice are redeemed by slyness, which is the relationship between the stage and the sexual hunger that runs through the seats" (Monsivais 1987:13, 8).
As Denis DeRougemont explains, those Celtic myths and medieval religious influences merge in the fables of chivalric quests, "and in these wonderful adventures nothing whatever is without its meaning; everything is symbol or delicate allegory; and only the ignorant stop at the apparent puerility of the tale, this puerility being intended of course to conceal the underlying meaning from the superficial glances of the uninformed" (125).
This has been a week in which certain men have been publicly confusing puerility for masculinity.
Victor Hugo declared, "The Academie is a masterpiece of senile puerility," and became an Academicien.
On Bernard Goldberg's book she is on much firmer ground; it was personal to the point of puerility.
Over the years,her books have been accused of a such an array of misdemeanours,including snobbery, racism and puerility, that back in the 1980s some librarians and schools reportedly refused to stock any.
In a belated "obituary" for the "Age of Eliot," penned by Cynthia Ozick for The New Yorker in 1989 (a typical screed, distinguished only in the venomous puerility of its ad hominem attacks), Ozick declares that nowadays "the bookish young" can find nothing of interest, much less value, in Eliot.
Pearson takes issue with the puerility of a plot that features an alien "burst[ing] bloodily into the loo .