fever

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fever

(Excitement), noun agitation, ardor, arousing, delirium, desire, disquiet, eagerness, enthusiasm, exhilaration, fervency, fever pitch, feverish excitement, feverishness, fire, fomentation, frenzy, galvanization, heat, intensity, panic, passion, provocation, stimulation, stirring up, tizzy, turmoil, upset, working up, zeal, zealousness, zest
Associated concepts: proceedings reaching a fever pitch

fever

(Illness), noun affliction, ailment, eleeated temperature, feverishness, has a disorder, has a malady, has an affliction, has an ailment, ill health, illness, in poor health, infirmity, not healthy, sickness, temperature
Associated concepts: fee services, health care
See also: furor
References in periodicals archive ?
He was eventually committed to an asylum, where he was beaten by guards and, in a tragic dose of irony, died of septicemia, the same bacterial spread that led women with puerperal fever to die of their disease.
A decoction of four plants, namely Alstonia scholaris, Aegle marmelos, Moringa oleifera, and Azadirachta indica was used for treatment of puerperal fever, pain or jaundice.
Similarly, supported by doctors' telephonic advice, most women with puerperal fever and about half of those with abortion complications could be managed locally.
Semmelweis instructed his interns to wash their hands with chlorinated lime solutions and documented an immediate reduction in puerperal fever incidence.
Loudon's avowed purpose is to survey the approximately two hundred years during which puerperal fever was widespread in Western Europe.
Soon, he noticed that mothers who were delivered by medical students in one clinic died of puerperal fever at a much higher rate than in another clinic where they were delivered by midwives.
Loudon does not say, although his material suggests that recurrent epidemics of puerperal fever may have been an inadvertent consequence of sociological and medical advances of the nineteenth century.
It was not until the observations of Oliver Wendell Holmes and Ignaz Semmelweis that puerperal fever was thought to be a communicable disease transmitted from health-care workers to patients.
general practitioners were equal in responsibility to midwives in causing deaths from puerperal fever.
In the case of puerperal fever (from Latin words meaning "childbearing," and more familiarly known as childbed fever), there were suspicious signs of a certain type of contagion.
His first child died of cholera in 1900; his younger sister first, and a daughter, later, were committed to mental hospitals; another daughter died of puerperal fever after childbirth; and the sudden death of his wife in 1938 left him bereft of her support not long before the suicide of their son.