generator

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Related to pulse generator: Signal generator, Function generator
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Analog filtering is the simplest one of monocycle UWB pulse generator methods.
The high voltage pulse generator produces 1kV nanosecond pulses for 100Q the load impedance.
A multifunction and reconfigurable pulse generator for ultrasound driving was introduced in [4].
AdvaStim's pulse generator technology is based on the company's VLSI-based ASICore chip architecture, along with its ASIControl embedded software.
In the transmitter, pulses are initiated by a pulse generator that generates rectangular monocycle pulses with sub-nanosecond duration.
This monocycle pulse generator needs two kinds of power supply voltage.
The prototype pulse generator uses horizontal foils to capture the energy from tidal streams, rather than the vertical blades used by conventional tidal generators.
Additional standard features are chain hoist access, cool power thermal stability, remote manual pulse generator, rigid tapping, top splash cover, and full headstock enclosure.
There is an emergency stop switch; left and right enable buttons; two rotary switches for both axis and resolution; four control pushbuttons for start, job, slide hold, and tool in/out; potentiometer; and manual pulse generator. Enable buttons include dead-man or live-man.
Controls include e-stop switch, left and right enable buttons, 2 rotary switches, 4 pushbuttons, potentiometer, and manual pulse generator. For safety compliance, enable button options include dead man (2-position-OFF/ON) or Live man (3-position-OFF/ON/OFF, for UL 1740 compliance).
When a power failure, blackout or voltage drop (of 20%) occurs, an off signal travels through the retention circuit, and the pulse generator starts the data backup process and shutdown of the computer.
The ICD has two parts - the leads and a pulse generator. The lead monitors the heart rhythm and delivers energy used for pacing, cardioversion and/or defibrillation.