punish

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punish

verb amerce, bring to retribution, call to account, castigate, chasten, chastise, condemn, correct, discipline, exact retribution, flog, inflict penalty, lash, penalize, reprimand, retaliate, scourge, sentence, slate, smite, subject to penalty, take to task, take vengeance on, teach a lesson to, torture, trounce, whip
Associated concepts: cruel and excessive punishment, cruel and inhuman punishment, cruel and unusual punishment, excessive punishment
Foreign phrases: In quo quis delinquit, in eo de jure est puniendus.In whatever the offense, he is to be punished by the law.
See also: beat, convict, fine, inflict, mulct, penalize, repay, reprehend, strike
References in periodicals archive ?
DAC also mentioned in its Decision that the information provided by the sports association KNBB with reference to the punishability and traceability of cocaine has left something to be desired.
From the Nuremberg records and commentaries, it appears that it was widely presumed that if the punishability of the conduct was determined to satisfy the principle of legality then the penalties prescribed by the Charter were appropriate.
Its tenet is that neither "natural evil" nor "traditional evil" should influence our judgment on punishability; instead, punishability should be determined by consensus or at least by the ability of those affected to consent.
Most plausibly understood, I suggest, mitigation for provoked homicides is not part of the substantive, forward-looking normativity of the criminal law, but rather is a backward-looking inquiry into the just extent of the given defendant's punishability.
Were a consensus attained and all demands for exactitude of the law provisions met, would not the initiation of criminal punishability at an earlier stage lead primarily to a criminalization of petty offense that are relatively easy to detect?
German society may well move toward harsher sentencing practices against sexual assault; this claim has been prevalent on the German socio-legal agenda for years, but especially focused on the punishability of sexual assault between married individuals, which is still not prohibited by law.