pupil

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pupil

1 in Scots law, a boy under 14 and a girl under 12, a distinction now largely superceded by the age of majority at 18.
2 in Scotland, a trainee advocate.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

PUPIL, civil law. One who is in his or her minority. Vide. Dig. 1, 7; Id. 26, 7, 1, 2; Code, 6, 30, 18; Dig. 50, 16, 239. One who is in ward or guardianship.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
It develops gradually and the lesions are considered to occur much earlier than becoming clinically visible on the lens capsule and pupillary opening.
The data were extracted from the pupil size of the animals with the aid of a microcomputer, and due to the uniqueness of the goats' shape of the eyeball and pupil (ellipsoidal), the dimensions of the larger diameter (horizontal), smaller diameter (vertical) and pupillary area (Figure 1A) were collected.
These conditions increase when the pupillary diameter becomes larger especially in night conditions.
(7) Parameters such as initial pupil size and duration/velocity/latency of pupillary contraction and dilatation are of clinical interest as they reflect the functional state of the eye.
Those infants who eventually fulfilled criteria for ASD showed a stronger pupillary response than infants who did not later fulfil ASD criteria.
The ophthalmologic examination revealed normal palpebral and dazzle reflexes and negative pupillary light reflexes (PLR) in both eyes (OU).
Comparisons between binocular and monocular refraction, AC/A ratio, and pupillary diameter in the patient group and the control group were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's correlation test.
The increase in IOP was considered steroid induced because there was no pupillary, block, inflammatory reaction, or pigment dispersion.
Patients who failed to follow up for six months, and with post-operative complications like emulsified silicon oil in anterior chamber or pupillary block were also excluded.
This was consistent with the LAT findings in high parity sows, indicating that long-term and recurrent space constraints might seriously affect the sows' mental health and produce depression symptoms, causing changes in LAT that are closely related to the pupillary contraction [12,23].