quack


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QUACK. One, who, without sufficient knowledge, study or previous preparation, and without the diploma of some college or university, undertakes to practice medicine or surgery, under the pretence that he possesses secrets in those arts.
     2. He is criminally answerable for his unskillful practice, and also, civilly to his patient in certain cases. Vide Mala praxis; Physician.

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He demanded of the federal and provincial authorities concerned to educate people about the menace of quackery, increase the strength of qualified doctors in rural and urban slums and launch a crackdown on quacks to eliminate this menace from the society.
There are at least two lakh quacks in the country, out of which around 50,000 are in Delhi alone.
As depicted in Westerns, quacks would come unannounced to a new town, gather large audiences, build trust by claiming to be doctors and by having 'plants' in the audience, make as much money as possible selling worthless products, then get out of town quickly before people learned that what they had bought had no medicinal value.
Rock, a well-known quack who practiced during the reign of Queen Anne.
The visit of the Quack Doctor marked the start of the Georgian fair at Beamish, one of the region's most popular tourist attractions, with a host of activities planned for the remainder of the half-term week.
On the other hand, dozens of quacks are playing with the health of the people," Maqbool Ahmad regrets the state of affairs.
It has a gradual decay, so it's hard to tell the difference between the actual quack and the echo.
And that means you, dear reader, can decide whether the North will quack.
The Quack Quack exhibit reminded me of how much of ourselves and our immediate experiences we bring to advertising messages.
A lively exhibition tracing the history of the colorful purveyors of patent and quack medicines over the past four centuries, "Quack, Quack, Quack: The Sellers of Nostrums in Prints, Posters, Ephemera & Books" contains 75 works ranging from humorous caricatures of itinerant quacks, flamboyant advertising posters, and promotional pamphlets for rival panaceas (each supported by extravagant claims of efficacy), to prints that document the first governmental attempts to curtail the more flagrant abuses.