quaint

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Related to quaintly: impatiently, perfunctorily, consecutively
References in classic literature ?
She snatched up an empty plate from the table, to represent a sheet of music, held it before her in the established concert-room position, and produced an imitation of the unfortunate singer's grimaces and courtesyings, so accur a tely and quaintly true to the original, that her father roared with laughter; and even the footman (who came in at that moment with the post-bag) rushed out of the room again, and committed the indecorum of echoing his master audibly on the other side of the door.
I murmured something affirmative in a doubtful tone and she remarked quaintly, with a certain curtness, "It's so unnecessary, this worry
No, thank you, sir," she said, with a quaintly pretty inclination of her head.
Such beauty as she had, in those early days, lay in a certain artless purity and tenderness of expression, and in the charming reddish-brown color of her hair, varying quaintly and prettily in different lights.
Adapted by Julian Fellowes ("Downton Abbey"), with a score by Georges Stiles and Anthony Drewe (who wrote new songs for the stage version of "Mary Poppins"), "The Wind in the Willows" is a quaintly old-school family entertainment, based on Kenneth Grahame's 1908 children's book.
Gauze Dressing Sizes 50X50mm Quaintly 5 Nos, 100X100mm Quaintly 4Nos.
Despite an alarming number of romantic proposals since the selfie became quaintly viral, the policeman loyally clings to his long-time girlfriend.
He begins his tour in the tyler-Moore as Prince but done Scottish Highlands and then journeys to Cumbria, Ferryside and Cornwall, where his stop is the quaintly named St Keyne Wishing Well Halt.
WINDSORS, but done Scottish Highlands and then journeys to Cumbria, Ferryside and Cornwall, where his stop is the quaintly named St Keyne Wishing Well Halt.
I find it quaintly amusing the newspaper headline and column constantly refers to him as a "Welshman" though.
Most of us are inured to what was once quaintly called "salty language.
No not a Football League fixture, though he played in three such Tyne-Wear derbies, but a game in a quaintly named Cock Of The North tournament at St James' Park.