quaint

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if articulating the quaintness the tale, the palace of the king, known as Raja Mahal, stands proudly beside the Betwa, reflecting its grandeur on the river flowing alongside, making it sight worth hours.
It retains that quaintness, a charm from a bygone era.
Given its proximity to the High Line, the brokerage has been targeting specialty boutiques, home goods retailers and local service providers to help retain the neighborhood's charm and quaintness.
By drawing us into lonely living rooms, nondescript workplaces, public gatherings, and family disputes, Lennon illuminates small truths of the American character, while the superficial quaintness of his style prevents it all from sounding didactic or pretentious.
This new translation seeks to 'free the text from the archaisms and corrosive quaintness of older English versions' and 'to get to the essential meaning of the original'.
Each painting is like an illustration from a storybook, filled with quaintness and charm and rich with meticulous details.
The train still maintains its quaintness with wood compartments and no brakes.
So the British Ikea-style stadiums (you can take them apart afterwards) can't escape having a homespun quaintness about them compared to the Birds Nest and the Water Cube.
THERE are some things people never speak of anymore, except with condescension at the quaintness of the concept.
a charm of its own, whether it's the sheer majesty of the Grand Mosque, the quaintness
The title Dad's Army seems an age away from the intended title of The Fighting Tigers, but it adds a brilliant quaintness to the show that pulled in TV audiences of 18 million viewers during the 1970s.
Whether all these sites and versions will remain accessible or not, John Kennedy is clearly of the opinion that earlier quaintness, formalism and archaisms will not persist, since the readers of these new translations are likely to have an urgency to understand 'philosophies and lifestyles strikingly different from those which now prevail in Western societies' (p.