queer

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References in periodicals archive ?
I wish to show the Fields's commonality with their mid-Victorian mentors and to draw out the way in which some of their queerest moves are invited by their serious commitment to an ethical aesthetics.
To his modest cottage, he has added fanciful architectural touches, such as "the queerest gothic windows (by far the greater part of them sham) and a gothic door" (206).
What if the word "dinner" did not just imply a sexual appetite but actually came to stand for sex in its queerest iterations?
The trouble with the famously ambiguous actor's revelation isn't how one defines "gay," but rather, what one makes of his "art"--the latest questionable example of which, a Skinemax-styled true crimer called "King Cobra," yields his queerest role yet.
The Marshallian strategy of marginalising protectionist contentions by suggesting that they have some merit, but only in the queerest of environments, is particularly writ large in Against the Tide.
In "'The queerest sense of echo', or Translating Imprudent Movables," her third chapter, Davison, drawing on the work of Emily Dalgarno, demonstrates how Woolf made use of her endeavors as a translator as a way of separating herself from realism and "extract[ing] the feminine consciousness from supposedly genderneutral or male-focused classics" (85).
Since that hearing, I've been to gay weddings that I can declare with gusto were the queerest events I've ever attended, and my derision for gay weddings has abated considerably.
The queerest place with the strangest people leading the oddest lives" - Newly unearthed comment by writer Charles Dickens on Harrogate, which has again been named as the most positive and contented place in Britain.
I shouldn't be let out of the house without a warning sign" Philosopher Alain de Botton "The queerest place with the strangest people leading the oddest lives" Newly unearthed comment by writer Charles Dickens on Harrogate, which has again been named as the most positive and contented place in Britain "Beauty is not important.
These people betray by their practice that their aversion to the split infinitive springs not from instinctive good taste, but from tame acceptance of the misinterpreted opinion of others; for they will subject their sentences to the queerest distortions, all to escape imaginary split infinitives.
In fact, Streetcar's queerest passage is Blanche's description of Allan Grey, placed "at almost the exact center of Streetcar's eleven scene structure, as if all dramatic action prior to it radiates backward and all after it projects forward, further emphasizing its often neglected importance" (Poteet 30):