quit

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Related to quitting: Quitting smoking

Quit

To vacate; remove from; surrender possession.

When a tenant leaves premises that he or she has been renting, the tenant is said to quit such premises.

A notice to quit is written notification given by a landlord to a tenant that indicates that the landlord wants to repossess the premises and that the tenant must vacate them at a certain designated time.

quit

v. to leave, used in a written notice to a tenant to leave the premises (notice to quit). (See: notice to quit, unlawful detainer)

quit

1 to free, release, absolve.
2 to give up, renounce, leave.
References in periodicals archive ?
"For example, they may discover that they need to use the FDA-approved cessation medications for a longer period of time or use more of the medication to maintain comfort and avoid withdrawal symptoms during the quitting process."
Whatever your reason may be for quitting, here's a timeline of what happens to your body after you quit smoking weed.
"A good quit plan addresses both short-term challenges of quitting the habit and long-term challenges of relapse.
Nicotine replacements like a patch or gum and other medications could double or triple the chances of successfully quitting, and coaching and counseling were definitely useful too, Science Daily reported.
But there is also wisdom behind quitting. When we don't get what we long for despite earnest efforts, it might be a sign that we should let go.
Created in partnership with the National Cancer Institute, Every Try Counts also offers smokers access to resources and tools to support the quitting process.
Getting them started with a quitting plan and tools while they are admitted boosts their chances of success.
The campaign was launched this week with new data showing quitting success rates at their highest for years.
I think the tax is positive in a way, because people will start to think of quitting smoking," said Sameeh, 28.
Quitting smoking adds life years not only for people 40 years old when starting HIV care, but also for people 50 or 60 when starting care.
But if you think that it's too late to experience any real health benefits from quitting, you're wrong.
Celebrities Phil Tufnell, Natasha Hamilton and Craig Revel Horwood will be joining thousands of others on the 28-day quitting challenge.