Rapine


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RAPINE, crim. law. This is almost indistinguishable from robbery. (q.v.) It is the felonious taking of another man's personal property, openly and by violence, against his will. The civilians define rapine to be the taking with violence, the movable property of another, with the fraudulent intent to appropriate it to one's own USC. Lec. El. Dr. Rom. Sec. 1071.

References in periodicals archive ?
heel-base bullet design then offered by Rapine was a dead ringer for ones found in original factory loads.
Paul (London, 1704), 12 (vain), 13 (spoils and rapine), 8 (all mankind), 9 (Europe), 14 (Minister).
Rapine, "Lot sizing with carbon emission constraints," European Journal of Operational Research, vol.
Euna classe degenerata, fisicamente e moralmente: incapace di adempiere Ia sua funzione, e che solo vive di piccole rapine e della tradizione imbastardita di un diritto feudale (Levi, 1990: 222).
They still rule us, and their great wealth would make you proud but for the fact it's of rapine and defalcation.
More blood, more heads on stakes, more adoration rapine, and, murder" (366).
Teypaz and Rapine [13] proved that this remains true even under the restricted case where G is bipartite.
Rapine, a now-defunct custom bullet mold manufacturer, made a proper one for a 210-grain heel-base bullet, which I still use.
It is astounding -- or would be astounding, if we were not living in an age given over to state terror and elite rapine.
The plot to use the crusades as a venture of rapine was developed in the main by European nobles, with the Venetians in the lead.
Achille Mbembe, for example, characterizes Africa's wars as "wars of rapine pitting one set of predators against others" (88).