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Re

[Latin, In the matter of; in the case of.]

A term of frequent use in designating judicial proceedings, in which there is only one party. Thus, "Re Vivian" signifies "In the matter of Vivian," or "in Vivian's Case."

Cross-references

In Re.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

re

‘in the matter of, concerning’.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

Re, verbis, scripto, consensu, traditione, junctura vestes, sumere pacta solent. Compacts are accustomed to be clothed by thing itself, by words, by writing, by consent, by delivery. Plow. 161.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
Methought, my sweet one, then I ceased to soar And fell - not swiftly as I rose before, But with a downward, tremulous motion thro' Light, brazen rays, this golden star unto!
You see, my Ray gave out and--" he coughs in the reek of the escaping gas.
A man with a ghastly scarlet head follows, shouting that he must go back and build up his Ray. The mate assures him that he will find a nice new Ray all ready in the liner's engine-room.
The engine-room is hot and stuffy; the clerks in the coach are asleep, and the Slave of the Ray is ready to follow them.
But this is not the story of Windpeter Winters nor yet of his son Hal who worked on the Wills farm with Ray Pearson.
And so these two men, Ray and Hal, were at work in a field on a day in the late October.
"I'm jealous sometimes, too," confessed Sara Ray, "and so my first resolution will be 'I shall try not to feel jealous when I hear the other girls in school describing all the sick spells they've had.'"
"I hate grammar too," sighed Sara Ray. "It seems so unimportant."
The hull of the Nautilus, resembling a long shoal, disappeared by degrees; but its lantern, when darkness should overtake us in the waters, would help to guide us on board by its distinct rays.
It was then ten in the morning; the rays of the sun struck the surface of the waves at rather an oblique angle, and at the touch of their light, decomposed by refraction as through a prism, flowers, rocks, plants, shells, and polypi were shaded at the edges by the seven solar colours.
"Because, though we are floating in space, our projectile, bathed in the solar rays, will receive light and heat.
Indeed, under these rays which no atmosphere can temper, either in temperature or brilliancy, the projectile grew warm and bright, as if it had passed suddenly from winter to summer.