re

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Re

[Latin, In the matter of; in the case of.]

A term of frequent use in designating judicial proceedings, in which there is only one party. Thus, "Re Vivian" signifies "In the matter of Vivian," or "in Vivian's Case."

Cross-references

In Re.

re

‘in the matter of, concerning’.

Re, verbis, scripto, consensu, traditione, junctura vestes, sumere pacta solent. Compacts are accustomed to be clothed by thing itself, by words, by writing, by consent, by delivery. Plow. 161.

References in classic literature ?
The whole world seemed to Ray Pearson to have become alive with something just as he and Hal had suddenly become alive when they stood in the corn field stating into each other's eyes.
The beauty of the country about Winesburg was too much for Ray on that fall evening.
I wish I could resolve that, too," sighed Sara Ray, "but it wouldn't be any use.
I shall not talk gossip," wrote Sara Ray with a satisfied air.
Methought, my sweet one, then I ceased to soar And fell - not swiftly as I rose before, But with a downward, tremulous motion thro' Light, brazen rays, this golden star unto
Every morning she placed a large basin full of water on her window-sill, and as soon as the sun's rays fell on the water the Rainbow appeared as clearly as it had ever done in the fountain.
My mate's arm's broke; my engineer's head's cut open; my Ray went out when the engines smashed; and
You see, my Ray gave out and--" he coughs in the reek of the escaping gas.
But we were bound to walk, so we went on, whilst above our heads waved medusae whose umbrellas of opal or rose-pink, escalloped with a band of blue, sheltered us from the rays of the sun and fiery pelagiae, which, in the darkness, would have strewn our path with phosphorescent light.
It was near noon; I knew by the perpendicularity of the sun's rays, which were no longer refracted.
Because, though we are floating in space, our projectile, bathed in the solar rays, will receive light and heat.
Indeed, under these rays which no atmosphere can temper, either in temperature or brilliancy, the projectile grew warm and bright, as if it had passed suddenly from winter to summer.