recover

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recover

v. to receive a money judgment in a lawsuit.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

recover

to gain something by the judgment of a court of law or to succeed in a lawsuit.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
And the re-cover project fits perfectly into the studio's ethos of 'rethink, redefine, reform'.
Add potatoes and re-cover then cook for another 30 minutes.
Depending on which of the three closures is used, consumers re-cover the product either by clicking a tab that is attached to the film into place or slipping a tab through a pre-cut opening in the packaging.
Commercial St., $53,301 for commercial: re-cover existing one-layer roof with one new layer 60 MIL TPO roof membrane on 15th floor and portions of fourth and fifth floors.
The result is that any coating, such as an antibacterial layer, would be "self-repairing" after small amounts of damage, as the molecular chains just below the damaged layer re-cover the surface.
Before leaving, douse the ashes until cold, throw any unburned sticks into the woods and re-cover the clearing as if you were never there.
Nearly a year and a half after several members sued the NCUA to re-cover $4 million involving the defunct New London Security Federal Credit Union, their case was recently dismissed by a federal court for missing a key deadline.
Harald Darius, noting that the oral direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran is widely expected to be the first of the new antithrombins to receive marketing approval for the treatment of acute DVT, observed that rivaroxaban's performance in EINSTEIN-appeared to be roughly comparable to that of dabigatran in the RE-COVER trial (N.
Harald Darius, noting that the oral direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran is widely expected to be the first of the new antithrombins to receive marketing approval for treatment of acute DVT, observed that rivaroxaban's performance in EINSTEIN-DVT appeared to beroughly comparable to that of dabigatran in the RE-COVER trial (N.
It is sometimes used as a transitive verb meaning rehash, as in "Let's not re-cover that old ground."