react

(redirected from reacted against)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms.
References in periodicals archive ?
He strongly condemned the way the army reacted against peaceful protesters in Fallujah, which reflected a lack of professionalism.
Stocks lost ground with investors increasingly becoming risk-averse amid growing uncertainties over the European debt crisis as Greece has faced difficulty in forming a new government following Sunday's general election in which voters reacted against austerity policies to tackle the country's debt problem, market analysts said.
He clarified that after the apex court's conviction verdict, people reacted against the ruling with grief and fury; but, the party did not asked them to do so.
BRUSSELS, January 24, 2012 (A.A) - The Liberals at the European Parliament reacted against an Armenian bill that was adopted by the French Senate on Monday.
On December 11, art historian Gail-Nina Anderson will take a historical look at pattern, where she will explore how William Morris and the Arts and Crafts Movement reacted against industrialisation.
But Pyongyang reacted against the demand, apparently aiming to limit the scope of facilities subject to inspection as much as possible.
The French have reacted against a document they think is an Anglo-Saxon plot to move away from a "social" Europe.
The Brotherhood had reacted against a painting style and subject matter of which Millais's Cymon and Iphigenia was fairly typical.
Her concern is with the interplay between groups and denominations: 'Christians of different persuasions reacted against beliefs and practices emphasised by others but they also responded in similar ways to common stimuli'.
To avoid causing graft-host incompatibility, the researchers then discarded from the mix those T cells that reacted against cells from the intended marrow recipient.
In the best work the colonized are shown to have either accommodated themselves to rule or reacted against an external imposition that remained intrinsically foreign.
Its downfall seems to involve some sort of "schismogenesis" or "inversion," in which many teachers violently reacted against being overworked and overwhelmed, culminating in the easy discarding of 8 years of reform with hardly a tear shed.