reason to complain

See: grievance
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
I arrived here in safety, and have no reason to complain of my reception from Mr.
As it was, nobody having reason to complain of unjustly-diminished wages, nobody cared about any preferences in which profit was not involved.
"I have no reason to complain of my lot," replied the Scarecrow.
To avoid which censure I fear I have run too much into the other extreme; and that if this treatise should happen to be translated into the language of Brobdingnag (which is the general name of that kingdom,) and transmitted thither, the king and his people would have reason to complain that I had done them an injury, by a false and diminutive representation.
During the reign of Charles II., however, the American colonies had but little reason to complain of harsh or tyrannical treatment.
We took their wives and also much booty, which we divided equitably amongst us, so that none might have reason to complain. I then said that we had better make off at once, but my men very foolishly would not obey me, so they staid there drinking much wine and killing great numbers of sheep and oxen on the sea shore.
Bright condescended to avail himself of my literary experience by constituting me editor of the "Wonder-Book." As he had no reason to complain of the reception of that erudite work by the public, he was now disposed to retain me in a similar position with respect to the present volume, which he entitled TANGLEWOOD TALES.
You are quite right, you have good reason to complain of us."
Who, my dear creature, hath reason to complain? Who missed an appointment last night, and left an unhappy man to expect, and wish, and sigh, and languish?"
An interview was forthwith procured, and Nathan was asked by his young master whether he had ever had any reason to complain of his treatment, in any respect.
Cole's carriagehorses returning from exercise, or a stray letterboy on an obstinate mule, were the liveliest objects she could presume to expect; and when her eyes fell only on the butcher with his tray, a tidy old woman travelling homewards from shop with her full basket, two curs quarrelling over a dirty bone, and a string of dawdling children round the baker's little bowwindow eyeing the gingerbread, she knew she had no reason to complain, and was amused enough; quite enough still to stand at the door.
"But it seems you had not much reason to complain of your fortune in your contest with him."