reasonable care


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reasonable care

n. the degree of caution and concern for the safety of himself/herself and others an ordinarily prudent and rational person would use in the circumstances. This is a subjective test of determining if a person is negligent, meaning he/she did not exercise reasonable care. (See: negligence, duty of care)

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Reasonable care on the part of a [physician] [health care provider] in obtaining the [consent] [informed consent] to treatment of a patient consists of
The law also states that every contract to supply a service, such as getting a haircut, or having home improvements carried out must be performed with reasonable care and skill.
Committee chairman Adrian Bailey said: "The risk of creating a right that services must be performed with reasonable care and skill is that traders see it as the standard to meet rather than a minimum requirement.
24) Even Connecticut and now Massachusetts, both reasonable care standard states, maintain some leniency for landowners depending upon the parties' notice of hazardous conditions, the landowner's control over the property, and weather related factors.
The maintenance of a mileage log is important for practitioners because it helps demonstrate that reasonable care has been taken and, in the event of an HMRC investigation, will limit the scope and number of years a tax inspector can seek to include in arriving at a financial settlement.
In a groundbreaking opinion, the Court of Appeals held for the first time that a hotel or other innkeeper owes a duty to use reasonable care when evicting a registered guest.
He told the jury that failure to take reasonable care and or have reasonable skill leaves the doctor criminally liable for the consequences of that negligence.
HMRC has said it attributes 50% of the tax gap to SMEs and that it believes, of that, one-third arises from errors and businesses failing to take reasonable care.
to exercise reasonable care, the breach of which establishes the second
He appeared at Selby Magistrates' Court and pleaded guilty to a breach of the Health and Safety at Work Act by failing to take reasonable care of those affected by his work activities.
The notion of "reasonable care" is esoteric by itself, and an exploration of the varied fact patterns under which different jurisdictions have found a broker has breached the duty of reasonable care would involve far more than this column permits.
Miss T Finch A There's a law that was passed over 50 years ago (the Occupiers Liability Act 1957) which states that the owners of the shopping centre must take reasonable care to ensure that visitors are reasonably safe in using the premises.