reasonable care


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reasonable care

n. the degree of caution and concern for the safety of himself/herself and others an ordinarily prudent and rational person would use in the circumstances. This is a subjective test of determining if a person is negligent, meaning he/she did not exercise reasonable care. (See: negligence, duty of care)

References in periodicals archive ?
The retailer in Ruskin's case is wrong as it does not matter that the update was free, all that matters is whether reasonable care and skill was exercised in providing the update, which it clearly wasn't.
"Although not based on negligence, the Court finds the cases sufficiently analogous to support finding a duty of reasonable care [in Doe]," Tunheim wrote.
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court then allowed an appeal to address whether an employer has a legal duty to use reasonable care to safeguard employees' sensitive personal information when stored on an internet accessible computer system, and whether the Economic Loss Doctrine permits recovery for purely economic damages which result from a breach.
Panel chairman, Commander Kyle Gordon, said it was "chilling" that Kalsi had stood by "failing to take reasonable care as a gentleman lay dying on the street".
The District Court granted summary judgment in favor of MetLife with respect to the Jugans' claim under Coverage A of the Policy, after deciding that no reasonable jury could find that the Jugans had used reasonable care to maintain heat in their home.
[Negligence is the failure to use reasonable care.] Reasonable care on the part of a [physician] [health care provider] in obtaining the [consent] [informed consent] to treatment of a patient consists of
He was told that as he had called a number that was not the bank's official number he had not acted with 'reasonable care' and they would not refund him.
A recovery effort may not be successful if there is no evidence to support the adverse party did not exercise "reasonable care under the circumstances."
For the first time there are now clear rules in place for what should happen if a service is not carried out with reasonable care and skill or as agreed with the consumer.
according to the state of Louisiana Civil Code article 2317.1: The owner or custodian of the thing is answerable for damage occasioned by its ruin, vice, or defect, only upon a showing that he knew or, in the exercise of reasonable care, should have known of the ruin, vice or defect which caused the damage, that the damage could have been prevented by the exercise of reasonable care, and that he failed to exercise such reasonable care.
Jasmin Seymore Dean says: Yes, demand they compensate you and tell them they have failed to carry out the work with "reasonable care and skill" (as per the Supply of Goods and Services Act 1982).

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