reception

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References in classic literature ?
But the finest thing that has happened in my day was a year or so ago; that was Charles Peace's reception - him they called 'the Bannercross Murderer' - an Englishman.
The king approved the plan, and as soon as the castle on the island could be prepared for their reception he and the prince arrived there, Schahzaman never leaving his son except for the prescribed public audiences twice a week.
It consisted of two kinds of wine; tea, bread, cheese, and cold meats, and was served on the centre-tables in the reception room and the verandahs--anywhere that was convenient; there was no ceremony.
Every morning he went to his minister's morning reception to amuse that official and his wife, and to pet their children.
So secluded was the life led by the two, father and daughter, that they showed themselves only at a few official receptions and, at certain times in the year, in two or three friendly drawing-rooms, where the fame of the professor and the beauty of Mathilde made a sensation.
There was that about Bill that reminded the butler of London and dignified receptions at the house of the Dowager Duchess of Waveney.
The principal reason of the marked difference which the two legitimate proprietors of the banquet made in the receptions of their guests, was to be explained by the entire difference which existed in their respective appearances.
In this same Society (if that were it which came to his dinners, and to Mrs Merdle's receptions and concerts), he hardly seemed to enjoy himself much, and was mostly to be found against walls and behind doors.
Pontellier's reception day--there was a constant stream of callers--women who came in carriages or in the street cars, or walked when the air was soft and distance permitted.
Her personal appearance settled the question of her reception before she opened her lips.
Monseigneur, one of the great lords in power at the Court, held his fortnightly reception in his grand hotel in Paris.
I shall not trouble the reader with the particular account of my reception at this court, which was suitable to the generosity of so great a prince; nor of the difficulties I was in for want of a house and bed, being forced to lie on the ground, wrapped up in my coverlet.