Recovery

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Recovery

The acquisition of something of value through the judgment of a court, as the result of a lawsuit initiated for that purpose.

For example, an individual might obtain recovery in the form of damages for an injury.

The term recovery is also used to describe the amount ultimately collected, or the amount of the judgment itself.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

recovery

n. the amount of money and any other right or property received by a plaintiff in a lawsuit.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

RECOVERY. A recovery, in its most extensive sense, is the restoration of a former right, by the solemn judgment of a Court of justice. 3 Murph. 169.
     2. A recovery is either true or actual, or it is feigned or common. A true recovery, usually known by the name of recovery simply, is the procuring a former right by the judgment of a court of competent jurisdiction; as, for example, when judgment is given in favor of the plaintiff when he seeks to recover a thing or a right.
     3. A common recovery is a judgment obtained in a fictitious suit, brought against the tenant of the freehold, in consequence of a default made by the person who is last vouched to warranty in such suit. Bac. Tracts, 148.
     4. Common recoveries are considered as mere forms of conveyance or common assurances; although a common recovery is a fictitious suit, yet the same mode of proceeding must be pursued, and all the forms strictly adhered to, which are necessary to be observed in an adversary suit. The first thing therefore necessary to be done in suffering a common recovery is, that the person who is to be the demandant, and to whom the lands are to be adjudged, would sue out a writ or praecipe against the tenant of the freehold; whence such tenant is usually called the tenant to the praecipe. In obedience to this writ the tenant appears in court either in person or by his attorney; but, instead of defending the title to the land himself, he calls on some other person, who upon the original purchase is supposed to have warranted the title, and prays that the person may be called in to defend the title which he warranted, or otherwise to give the tenant lands of equal value to those he shall lose by the defect of his warranty. This is called the voucher vocatia, or calling to warranty. The person thus called to warrant, who is usually called the vouchee, appears in court, is impleaded, and enters into the warranty by which means he takes upon himself the defence of the land. The defendant desires leave of the court to imparl, or confer with the vouchee in private, which is granted of course. Soon after the demand and returns into court, but the vouchee disappears or makes default, in consequence of which it is presumed by the court, that he has no title to the lands demanded in the writ, and therefore cannot defend them; whereupon judgment is given for the demandant, now called the recoverer, to recover the lands in question against the tenant, and for the tenant to recover against the vouchee, lands of equal value in recompense for those so warranted by him, and now lost by his default. This is called the recompense of recovery in value; but as it is, customary for the crier of the court to act, who is hence called the common vouchee, the tenant can only have a nominal, and not a real recompense, for the land thus recovered against him by the demandant. A writ of habere facias is then sued out, directed to the sheriff of the county in which the lands thus recovered are situated; and, on the execution and return of the writ, the recovery is completed. The recovery here described is with single voucher; but a recovery may, and is frequently suffered with double, treble, or further voucher, as the exigency of the case may require, in which case there are several judgments against the several vouchees.
    5. Common recoveries were invented by the ecclesiastics in order to evade the statute of mortmain by which they were prohibited from purchasing or receiving under the pretence of a free gift, any land or tenements whatever. They have been used in some states for the purpose of breaking the entail of estates. Vide, generally, Cruise, Digest, tit. 36; 2 Saund. 42, n. 7; 4 Kent, Com. 487; Pigot on Common Recoveries, passim.
     6. All the learning in relation to common recoveries is nearly obsolete, as they are out of use. Rey, a French writer, in his work, Des Institutions Judicaire del'Angleterre, tom. ii. p. 221, points out what appears to him the absurdity of a common recovery. As to common recoveries, see 9 S. & R. 330; 3 S. & R. 435; 1 Yeates, 244; 4 Yeates, 413; 1 Whart. 139, 151; 2 Rawle, 168; 2 Halst. 47; 5 Mass. 438; 6 Mass. 328; 8 Mass. 34; 3 Harr. & John. 292; 6 P. S. R. 45,

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
BOB IRVING, head golf professional at The Founders Club, provided me with this simple formula for hitting a recovery shot with an iron out of deep rough bordering a fairway.
Out-of-bounds is down the entire right side of the hole, and anything over the green will run down a steep slope that makes for a very difficult recovery shot.
But the 30-year-old from Sheffield then hit a wayward drive on the 17th which left him blocked out by trees and could only hit his attempted recovery shot into more trouble.
McIlroy was within four of the lead when he produced a brilliant recovery shot on the eighth to set up his third birdie of the day, but the World No.3 bogeyed the 11th, 12th and 15th to fall down the leaderboard.
But the Australian took on the brave recovery shot and was rewarded when his approach pitched 10 yards short of the green and bounced over the water.
It was advantage Noren on the last when he split the fairway after Hend hooked his tee shot into the trees, but the 43-year-old Australian took on the brave recovery shot and was rewarded when his approach pitched 10 yards short of the green and bounced over the water - just as Noren's had done on Saturday.
A brilliant left-handed recovery shot helped American Brendon Todd to his first PGA Tour title, a two-stroke victory at the $6.9 million HP Byron Nelson Championship in Texas.Todd, who had never finished better than sixth on tour, displayed impressive poise and a sizzling short game to card a bogey-free four-under-par 66 at the Four Seasons TPC in Irving.He finished at 14-under 266, while Canadian Mike Weir (67), without a win since 2007, claimed second place on 12-under.Todd collected $1.24 million and an invitation to next year's Masters, less than two hours down the road from where he went to college at the University of Georgia in Athens."I thought I could win on the PGA Tour.
Hangover Joe's (OTCQB:HJOE) announced on Tuesday the launch of a partnership with the The Reese Group for Regional Grocery, as well as the USA's largest consumer products broker to convenience stores, for the sales and marketing of the former's "The Hangover" Recovery Shot.
I think that's what's exciting about Augusta National, the recovery shot.
His ball settled on the carpet in the bar and he was allowed to play his recovery shot back onto the green, after club members moved out of the way..
World No.1 McIlroy hit a good recovery shot to five feet and McDowell held his nerve to seal the win.
That's where the 40-year-old (below) holed his recovery shot from the rough on the 336-yard par four to win Where Eagles Dare and land himself this week's custom-fitted Yonex EzoneSD driver from our friends at American Golf.