Rector

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RECTOR, Eccl. law. One who rules or governs a name given to certain officers of the Roman church. Dict. Canonique, h.v.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
When asked about the proudest moments of his life, he returns to the afternoon of the Rectorial Ball.
With the movement of the professors to the core of the university, Newman called for one further structural change that would help to offset the totalizing tendencies of the specialists, a modification of the "Rectorial Council." The Rectorial Council was significant in the life of the university.
I loved his televison and radio work, his Glasgow University rectorial address and especially his platform oratory.
Other appointments made by the bishop include Reverend Nia Catrin Williams as area Dean for the Deanery of Ogwen, Reverend John Martin Riley as area Dean for the Deanery of Cyffylliog and Mawddwy, and Jane Rome Bailey as team vicar in the Rectorial Benefice of Holyhead.
It was also in the Forest Bar one night during the rectorial campaign that I got talking with Bill Campbell, who now runs Mainstream Publishing.
If you put your back to the Seine and have Notre Dame behind you, and drop in for a moment in St-Julien-le-Pauvre, where Gregory of Tours sang the night office in the shrine that stood there in the sixth century, you may launch yourself from this ancient rectorial church of the medieval university of Paris toward the south, up the hill to Ste-Genevieve, along the route to Orleans (the Roman Genabum), and thus on the way to Rome; indeed, the Roman road is still deep beneath your feet.
His 1919 Rectorial Address to the University of St.
The first three essays by Theodore Kisiel, Jacques Taminiaux and Catalin Partenie look at specific texts; respectively, the Rectorial Address, Sophocles' Antigone and the Sophist lectures of 1924-25.
Despite heavy spending, the first Viscount saved money, lending 17,000 [pounds sterling], mainly to turnpike trusts, besides loans to Edmund Burke, and buying sizable properties and the rectorial tithes of Dudley.
In 35% of parishes in England and Wales owners of former rectorial land are liable for the cost of repairs to the parish church.
The issue arises because the couple's land includes a field called Clanacre, which is accepted as rectorial property.