redundancy

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redundancy

termination of employment because of the disappearance of the need for the job. In the employment law of the UK, certain rights accrue to someone who is made redundant, i.e. if his dismissal is the result wholly or mainly of the cessation of the employer's business or to the cessation or diminution of demands for particular work. Redundancy can be a potentially fair reason for dismissal, preventing a claim for unfair dismissal, but it might be unfair if the particular employee has been unfairly selected, as where he is perhaps the longest-serving employee but is the first to be made redundant. In any event, an employee who has served two years of continuous employment will be entitled to a redundancy payment based upon the years of service and the employee's age.

REDUNDANCY. Matter introduced in an answer, or pleading, which is foreign to the bill or articles.
     2. In the case of Dysart v. Dysart, 3 Curt. Ecc. R. 543, in giving the judgment of the court, Dr. Lushington says: "It may not, perhaps, be easy to define the meaning of this term [redundant] in a short sentence, but the true meaning I take to be this: the respondent is not to insert in his answer any matter foreign to the articles he is called upon to answer, although such matter may be admissible in a plea; but he may, in his answer, plead matter by way of explanation pertinent to the articles, even if such matter shall be solely in his own knowledge and to such extent incapable of proof; or he may state matter which can be substantiated by witnesses; but in this latter instance, if such matter be introduced into the answer and not afterwards put in the plea or proved, the court will give no weight or credence to such part of the answer."
     3. A material distinction is to be observed between redundancy in the allegation and redundancy in the proof. In the former case, a variance between the allegation and the proof will be fatal if the redundant allegations are descriptive of that which is essential. But in the latter case, redundancy cannot vitiate, because more is proved than is alleged, unless the matter superfluously proved goes to contradict some essential part of the allegation. 1 Greenl. Ev. Sec. 67; 1 Stark. Ev. 401.

References in periodicals archive ?
This technology completely used fly ash and bottom ash characteristic and all negative influence on production are eliminated (like instability of disposal material, redundance of water used like transport medium and pollute water and air).
The redundance of Main Street offices in East Hampton was due to acquisitions of local companies' offices over the past several years, the spokesperson said.
In addition, he asked with customary redundance that after all the appropriate fees had been paid for these, the remainder of his estate 'all be spent in pious works and alms for my soul....
For example, the concept of redundance is considered in linguistic studies of the utterance, in text semiotics as well as in biosemiotic studies of the genetic code.
Gosse's discriminating criticism is not at odds with the material "figure" of the edition, but precisely fulfils its purpose: purchasers of the V&D could be sure they were getting their Rubaiyat in a setting whose redundance of mediocrity was itself a guarantee of value.
While this change is linked to a revolutionary process, the need to consolidate installations is really an evolutionary response to the new Logistics Corps, coupled with the consolidation of officer training, and is based on the need to reduce redundance in combat developments and training.
Owing to such redundance components, the interruption time can be reduced to switching time many times shorter than repair durations [2].
In spite of redundance and obscurity in the style of the narrative, Constantia found in it powerful excitements of her sympathy" (62).
Michel Melot, in The Art of Illustration, claims that "the image then is no longer an appendix, ornament or redundance of the text.
For example, Roseberry-McKibben (2001) recommended strategies for teaching English vocabulary and phonological awareness skills using a Thematic Redundance Approach, which uses repetition and multiple exposures of stimuli as a strategy for language learning.
Takada, K., 'Aging Workers in Japan: from Reverence to Redundance' (1993) 20 Ageing International 17
The maximum complexity can be represented as that of a structure containing an amount of information which cannot be compressed in an algorithm, or rather, which can be described only by an algorithm composed of a number of bits of information comparable to that of the structure itself: i.e., complexity corresponds to the size of the calculation program needed to describe it, and what is defined as fundamental complexity is that of a structure (e.g., a sequence) which--having no limits of symmetry, periodicity or redundance, but rather an aperiodic order--possesses for that very reason the prerequisite for the maximum possible information content, though no analytical expression thereof can be found.