regroup

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Was the task of revolutionaries to build tendencies, groups, and parties in which a politics of socialist revolution could be spread throughout the unions and mass organizations, culminating in a regroupment of the revolutionary left, or could small, clandestine cells of armed guerrillas spark popular insurrection or effect coup d'etats and seize power in the name of the dispossessed?
Design contest:Contest of project management - construction for the regroupment of psychiatric units of the Hospital Center of Saint-Malo.
Since then, the regroupment areas have been dismantled and disappeared, whereas the New Villages continue to exist on the sites where they were first established.
37) The border area was also cleared, through regroupment, of populations potentially sympathetic to the insurgency.
Where traditional leadership is dislocated and dispersed and the community fractionalized along multiple dimensions, organizations provide both the structure and the ideology for regroupment and involvement.
In 2001, the DSP called for a regroupment of all Australian socialist organizations.
They operate both as spaces of withdrawal and regroupment and as training grounds for agitational activities directed toward wider publics.
So many aspects of Manning's commentary are helpful and clarifying that I would like to offer mainly praise and endorsement in the spirit of regroupment and unity.
Reagan's "package" of sanctions, designed specifically for its visibility and its ineffectiveness, provides a breathing space for this regroupment and an alibi for the fainthearted.
There was a transit camp for Spanish refugees, secure shelter, a regional gathering of the Jews and a center Harkis regroupment camp and their families.
As part of the DDR process, in January 2008, the Defense and Security Forces completed regroupment, while as of early 2009, the New Forces were still going through the process.
Whenever possible, the British relied upon regroupment, in which existing communities were consolidated and fortified, resettling or moving everyone only when absolutely necessary.