Regular

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Regular

Customary; usual; with no unexpected or unusual variations; in conformity with ordinary practice.

An individual's regular course of business, for example, is the occupation in which that person is normally engaged to gain a livelihood.

References in periodicals archive ?
But even if an app is deemed a mobile medical app by the FDA, the agency does not intend to regulate apps that pose minimal risks to consumers.
Part of the problem, says Julia Liou of AHS, is that the government does not regulate chemicals that are being used in the products nail technicians work with daily.
Instead of trying to identify "liberal" and "conservative" trends, the contributors show state-builders using theories drawn from various sources, in eclectic ways, to try to regulate diverse societies.
Many herbs demonstrate a strong influence over the endocrine system, helping women regulate erratic hormone surges.
On November 30, 2001, the Diet passed a law that went into effect May 27, 2002, to regulate online infringement of third party rights, including defamation, copyright infringement and privacy violations.
How Michigan and Maine regulate or fail to regulate assisted living is not particularly significant to a family looking to find a home for an elderly resident of Florida or Arizona.
In this case, it was a federal agency given the power to regulate the pipelines.
Marla Felcher that listed baby bath seats as one of the products that CPSC has wrongly failed to regulate. Felcher cites lack of adequate funding for the agency and the restrictive CPSC statutes for these and other failures in the baby products area.
In the United States, however, things are not so simple; the very nature of viruses puts them in a category of objects that are difficult to regulate.
Under the new law, the various regulators regulate functions.
Supreme Court ruled that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not have the authority to regulate tobacco/nicotine products.
Such subtle patterns of exclusion and coercion--in effect, teaching citizens to regulate themselves--are what Michel Foucault referred to as "governmentality," and these maneuvers are precisely what cultural policy takes as its object of study.

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