reify

(redirected from reifications)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
References in periodicals archive ?
If reification brings with it the commodification and objectification of the entire life-world, it must be said that it has different effects and ramifications for the proletariat than for the bourgeoisie.
Not merely this, but the same broad process of the universalization of commodity exchange and reification also creates the proletariat as a class: it results, Lukacs argues, in the abolition of the isolated individual (171).
But if the reification of reality is dissolved into an understanding of flux and change, if the working of capital can be broken into "an unchanging process of its production and reproduction," then "it is possible for the proletariat to discover that it is itself the subject of this process even though it is in chains and is for the time being unconscious of the fact" (181).
Dans ce contexte, tant la faible reconnaissance de l'aspect fondamentalement interpersonnel et humain a la base de l'assurance que la distance critique face a la mise en marche--et sa regulation par le biais de regles juridiques--nous ramenent a une notion a connotation marxiste, soit la reification.
Dans un texte anterieur (5), nous nous sommes interesses au lien possible entre la notion de reification et celle de contrat.
Or, tant la theorie des contrats que la pratique juridico-assurantielle tendent vers une individualisation et une reification des parties et de la relation obligationnelle dans son ensemble (II).
Entrepreneurs can be both creators and victims of new market structure reifications.
An important caveat is that only reifications that can become part of the larger social construction are viable.
On participation and reification, the conclusion is that a hybrid approach might work best if it were designed such that even though reifications of many concepts might be available, there would always be instances for which meaning was only obtainable through negotiation.
The author's assertion that a hybrid approach of having some concepts accessible through reifications while having some crucial ones only attainable through "negotiations of meaning" might make the most progress in a community of practice does not seem to have anything to support it.
But, on the minus side, the ultimate consequence of liberalism's reification of individualism was tragic.
The reason he would deplore it, again, is that this agenda just deepens the reification of the outmoded conceptions of liberal individualism.