reinstitute


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As a result, some military experts have speculated that the United States may need to reinstitute the military draft so that it can maintain adequate forces for its military operations.
Thus, the IRS can reinstitute collection action once the two-day period has expired, until the CAP hearing request is received.
We must reinstitute the importance of education in our lives, so that we are able to educate ourselves without needing support from a majority who does not want to see us excel academically in the first place.
We recognize the discomfort that the passengers of Varig have experienced, but all can be certain that we are working hard and quickly to solve the problems, reinstitute the network and normalize services," Varig President Marcelo Bottini said.
Under the law, the governor can reinstitute the cap at will, but Gov.
In a 29-page brief, county prosecutors urged the Los Angeles Superior Court's appellate division to reverse an order dismissing the case against the six and to order the trial court to reinstitute criminal proceedings.
In addition, PACE has been working to reinstitute national bargaining in the paper industry, so we can maintain wage and benefits standards in the coming difficult years.
After all, investigators always can cut back or reinstitute the surveillance if needed.
Ganz documents how the perceived slights of Agnolo Acciaiuoli and Dietisalvi Neroni by Cosimo de' Medici contributed to the willingness of these two ottimati to take advantage of Piero di Cosimo de' Medici's relative weakness by attempting to reinstitute a purer, pre-Medicean form of republican government.
proposed something no lawmaker had done in years: legislation to reinstitute the draft idea sparked several weeks of lively debate in the halls of government, on TV pundit shows and in the op-ed pages.
The group said any efforts to reinstitute the tax "should be met by strong action by the U.
The sheriff said: "Perhaps we should reinstitute the practice of having a whipping post for solicitors who are responsible for their clients' absence.