Reputation

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reputation

n. a person's good name, honor and what the community thinks of him/her. The quality and value of one's reputation is a key issue in suits for defamation (libel and slander) since the damage to one's reputation by published untruths may determine the amount of judgment against the defamer. Sometimes a person's reputation is so great that most defamation cannot do him/her much harm. (See: defamation, libel, slander)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

REPUTATION, evidence. The opinion generally entertained by persons who know another, as to his character, (q.v.) or it is the opinion generally entertained by person; who know a family as to its pedigree, and the like.
     2. In general, reputation is evidence to prove, 1st. A man's character in society. 2d. A pedigree. (q.v.) 3d. Certain prescriptive or customary rights and obligations and matters of public notoriety. (q.v.) But as such evidence is in its own nature very weak, it must be supported. 1st. When it relates to the exercise of the right or privilege, by proof of acts of enjoyment of such right or privilege, within the period of living memory; 1 Maule & Selw. 679; 5 T. R. 32; afterwards evidence of reputation may be given. 2d. The fact must be of a public nature. 3d. It must be derived from persons likely to know the facts. 4th. The facts must be general and, not particular. 5th. They must be free from suspicion. 1 Stark. Ev. 54 to 65. Vide 1 Har. & M'H. 152; 2 Nott & M'C. 114 5 Day, R. 290; 4 Hen. & M. 507; 1 Tayl. R. 121; 2 Hayw. 3; 8 S. & R. 159; 4 John. R. 52; 18 John. R. 346; 9 Mass. R. 414; 4 Burr. 2057; Dougl. 174; Cowp. 594; 3 Swanst. 400; Dudl. So. Car. R. 346; and arts. Character; Memory.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
It does not provide all the answers, but it is, we hope, an important contribution to the debate about how to integrate reputational factors into company valuations.
The internet: There is little the internet doesn't touch today, including reputational damage.
With underwriters' consent, an event that threatens major reputational damage could entitle the client to crisis management advice worth up to $1 million.
"They're also starting to become comfortable with big data techniques and underwriting reputation risks, and that will bring about even more insurance products directly targeted at reputational losses."
Many companies already maintain clawback policies that go beyond financial re-statements to cover detrimental conduct more broadly, particularly in industries where the potential for reputational or economic harm is high, such as financial services.
Failure to guard against cybercrime, Ototo said, will translate not only to the loss of members funds, but also a "reputational risk to the sector".
Mr Bailey was warned he risks making a "mockery" of the watchdog if it continues to delay publication, with Stewart Hosie MP adding the hold-up risks "reputational damage" to the FCA.
This Article identifies and explains the operation of four reputational sanctions: financial, policy, regulatory spillover, and barriers to entry.
Still, the situation should be a wake-up call to all of higher ed: Campus protests can cause reputational harm, says Kevin Kruger, president of NASPA, an organization for student affairs professionals.
Rethinking Reputational Risk: How to Manage the Risks That Can Ruin Your Business, Your Reputation and You
As a result of Haugh's commentary, the lawsuit claims the Weekly has lost ad revenue and "now has its business relationship with Santa Clara imminently threatened." Additionally, Barber alleges he has "suffered reputational harm impairing numerous business ventures" from the "egregious false statements of fact." Barber is seeking compensatory and statutory damages as well as attorneys' fees.
Considered from one angle, reputational damage is like any other source of risk, which can affect the corporate bottom line and growth.