rescript


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rescript

in ancient Rome, an ordinance taking the form of a reply by the emperor to a question on a point of law.

RESCRIPT, conv. A counterpart.
     2. In the canon law, by rescripts are understood apostolical letters, which emanate from the pope, under whatever form they may be. The answers of the pope in writing are so called. Diet. Dr. Can. h.v. Vide Chirograph; Counterpart; Part.

References in periodicals archive ?
The author often overstresses the emperor's involvement in the rescripts' rhetoric.
Through the survivor's narrative, which integrates the traumatic events into his or her memory of the past, those events are reinterpreted and rescripted. Thus, both for the trauma sufferers, to whom the distinction between past and present does not meaningfully exist, and for the witnesses who receive and acknowledge their traumatic narratives, the past is made available for transformative and potentially recuperative re-narration.
(37) Despite Reshid Pasha's views as its principle architect to the contrary, the Gulhane Rescript and its embedded promise to respect the "life, honour and property" of all Ottoman subjects, including the non-Muslims, was initially seen by some Europeans as a statement of individual liberties.
As Ulpian noted in his commentary on Hadrian's rescript, the penalty of death applied only in those areas where the crime was most prolific.
(25) In 1890, the "Imperial Rescript on Education" (that is, the Emperor's words to students) was issued and became the basic moral guideline until the end of the WWII.
Uchimura, a Christian convert, is best known in the West for three things: 1) his refusal as a young high school teacher to bow deeply before a copy of the Imperial Rescript on Education; 2) his book How I Became a Christian (1893); and 3) his concept of mukyokai, or non-affiliation with any church denomination.
In Massachusetts, for example, "[n]o execution shall issue upon a judgment until the exhaustion of all possible appellate review thereof, and the receipt by the clerk of the trial court of the appropriate rescript or order." (18) In several states, government agencies and officers are entitled to a stay of enforcement pending their appeal from a judgment.
Kevin Moriarty's Richard III provided a wealth of material for those interested in thinking through how directors rescript Shakespeare's plays for modern audiences.
The news, flashed to the four corners of a tense andexpectant world, stated that Emperor Hirohito had accepted the PotsdamDeclaration, had issued an Imperial Rescript, and was ready to order his forces to cease resistance at once and lay down their arms.
In 1882 an Imperial Rescript to Soldiers and Sailors embodied the famous precept that "duty is more weighty than a mountain; death is no heavier than a feather." It was followed some years later by a Rescript on Education which decreed respect for the Constitution, observance of the laws, and courage in the defence of the State and the Imperial Throne.
(61.) A rescript of 393 stated that Judaism was "not a sect prohibited by the laws" (CT 16.8.9), but subsequent laws tightened the screws on the Jewish communities (e.g., CT 16.8.21-22).
I ask the dreamer to rescript the dream using active imagination, and go over the dream one more time with this change being the ending.