respondent

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Related to respondent behavior: Respondent conditioning

Respondent

In Equity practice, the party who answers a bill or other proceeding in equity. The party against whom an appeal or motion, an application for a court order, is instituted and who is required to answer in order to protect his or her interests.

respondent

n. 1) the party who is required to answer a petition for a court order or writ requiring the respondent to take some action, halt an activity or obey a court's direction. In such matters the moving party (the one filing the petition) is usually called the "petitioner." Thus, the respondent is equivalent to a defendant in a lawsuit, but the potential result is a court order and not money damages. 2) on an appeal, the party who must respond to an appeal by the losing party in the trial court, is called "appellant" in the appeals court.

respondent

noun answerer, appellant, defendant, party answering a summons or bill, replier, responder
See also: contender, defendant, litigant, open, party, responsive

respondent

the other party to a petition or an APPEAL.

RESPONDENT, practice. The party who makes an answer to a bill or other proceeding in chancery. In the civil law, this term signifies one who answers or is security for another; a fidejussor. Dig. 2, 8, 6.

References in periodicals archive ?
To create the typology of respondent behavior, the six variables (percentages of questions with an objective behavioral aspect) were subjected to a cluster analysis.(2) A cluster analysis with four clusters results in a statistically acceptable and interpretable solution (overall [R.sup.2]=.61).
This report is completed by the interviewer after the interview and is intended to provide information about some aspect of respondent behavior. Groves has observed that these questions are not often used to evaluate the quality of survey data (Groves, 1989).
Earlier in this paper, two possible causes for divergence in respondent behavior across question formats were identified.
For instance, Schoenfeld (1976) contended that respondents are seen as obeying "static" laws whereas operants obey "dynamic" laws; Schlosberg (1937) suggested that respondent conditioning may involve the conditioning of preparatory responses of an emotional or perceptual type, whereas operant responses are precise and adaptive; and Rescorla and Solomon (1967) noted that operant behavior is implied to be free and varied and respondent behavior is rigid and automatic.
In their book, Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP), Kohlenberg and Tsai (1991) describe both operant and respondent behaviors relevant to expressing feelings and show how avoidance of feeling can lead to diminished contact with the environment.