restrain

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restrain

verb arrest, bar, bind, blockade, bridle, call a halt, check, confine, constrain, contain, control, cramp, curb, curtail, debar, delimit, deprive of liberty, detain, deter, disallow, discountenance, enchain, enclose, enjoin, fasten, fetter, forbid, govern, hamper, handcuff, handicap, harness, hinder, hold, hold back, hold in check, hold in custody, immure, imprison, incarcerate, inhibit, interdict, jail, keep, keep under control, keep within bounds, limit, lock up, manacle, moderate, obstruct, oppose, prevent, prohibit, proscribe, quell, repress, reprimere, restrict, retinere, shackle, stifle, stop, subdue, subjugate, suppress, take into custody, take prisoner, tenere, tie, trammel, vanquish, wall in, withhold
Associated concepts: restraining order, restraining statute
Foreign phrases: Exempla illustrant non restrigunt legem.Examples illustrate, but do not restrain, the law.
See also: adjourn, allay, apprehend, arrest, balk, ban, bar, block, border, bound, cancel, capture, censor, check, clog, commit, condemn, confine, constrain, constrict, continue, control, curb, debar, delay, deter, diminish, discipline, discourage, disqualify, enclose, enjoin, estop, fetter, foil, forbear, forbid, govern, halt, hamper, hinder, hold up, immure, impede, imprison, inhibit, interdict, jail, limit, lock, mitigate, moderate, mollify, obstruct, occlude, police, preclude, prevent, prohibit, proscribe, repress, restrict, rule, stay, stem, stifle, stop, strangle, subdue, subjugate, suppress, thwart, toll, trammel, withhold
References in periodicals archive ?
He is equipped with a certain Old World charm, a restrainedly extravagant coiffure, a velvet dinner jacket for which the word 'louche' may well have been invented, and a streak of keep-him-away-from-your-wifeness as wide as the Channel.
The submission of the repentant enemies, for example, is much more abject in Chaucer than in Renaud; in Renaud they are sorry, but restrainedly so, while in Chaucer, their self-abasement is reminiscent of a sinner's before God.
Mixing magic realism and a seriously risqu scene involving a courgette into the proceedings, the film veers between the operatic Latin temperament of Marceli's performance and the quieter, more restrainedly poignant one of Ansara just as it skips between its three languages.