restriction

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restriction

n. any limitation on activity, by statute, regulation or contract provision. In multi-unit real estate developments, condominium and cooperative housing projects, managed by homeowners' associations or similar organizations are usually required by state law to impose restrictions on use. Thus, the restrictions are part of the "covenants, conditions and restrictions," intended to enhance the use of common facilities and property, recorded and incorporated into the title of each owner.

restriction

noun  bonds, boundary, bounds, check, circumscription, condition, confinement, constriction, containment, curb, demarcation, finis, impediment, interdiction, limitation, modus, prohibition, qualification, regulation, reservation, restraint
Associated concepts: restriction on alienation
See also: abridgment, arrest, bar, barrier, blockade, bondage, censorship, check, clause, coercion, commitment, compulsion, condition, constraint, custody, damper, decrease, detention, deterrence, deterrent, disadvantage, duress, economy, embargo, enclosure, encumbrance, estoppel, fetter, force, frugality, guideline, hindrance, impediment, imprisonment, incarceration, injunction, limitation, moderation, modification, obstacle, obstruction, prohibition, provision, qualification, quota, reservation, restraint, salvo, veto
References in periodicals archive ?
(12.) Gilman's distinction between new and old immigrants coincides with the ideology of restrictionism. Restrictionists advocated limited immigration of particular national groups to the United States.
He disagrees, for example, that an overweening pattern of immigration restrictionism is sweeping across "Fortress Europe," even less across the United States.
In the last years of the nineteenth century, restrictionism seemed to have hit a bear market.
He calls that restrictionism "one of the more liberal, generous and, most of all, successful attempts to rescue oppressed refugees in modern history" (10).
Given recent trends toward devolution and restrictionism, the possibility may emerge less "obscurantist" than it has been considered in the recent past.
Appalled at what they identified as British restrictionism, some Washington politicians pressured their government to open talks with the London administration aimed at curtailing the power of cartels.(7) American military personnel visited British factories, studied their operations and then talked freely on both sides of the Atlantic about where Britain was going wrong.(8) Most importantly, it appeared that hard evidence existed to prove the productivity gap.
John Tanton, a Michigan opthamologist and outspoken policy activist, served as the 1980s prelude to equally-heated debates throughout the 1990s - debates that engaged far more formidable political and policy figures, from the immigration restrictionism of California governor Pete Wilson and economist George Borjas to the immigration advocacy of National Council of La Raza director Raul Yzaguirre and economist Julian Simon.
Hence, the pressures for restrictionism are weaker than anticipated by the conventional wisdom that expects labor to lobby for closure.
This higher degree of internalization of the growth process has obvious advantages in times of concern with wade restrictionism, particularly in a context in which most developing countries rather than a tiny few might pursue such a strategy.
But he turned instead to a craft orientation and conservative "business unionism." In a carefully limned portrait, eminently fair if often etched in acid, Laslett explores the influences--such as pragmatism and anti-intellectualism--that drew Gompers from a youthful radicalism to distrust of state power, hostility to socialists, espousal of political voluntarism, growing antagonism to industrial unionism, readiness to cooperate with the National Civic Federation, and, in an age dominated by cultural biases against blacks and the new immigrants, advocacy of immigrant restrictionism and exclusion of blacks from trade unions.
He went on to observe that the millions of immigrants who had "flooded America before 1914" (when restrictionism first started gaining serious traction) were an unmitigated blessing for everyone--themselves and the Americans already in the country.