resuscitate

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resuscitate

verb breath fresh life into, bring back to life, cure, improve, reanimate, recreate, recuperate, reestablish, refresh, regenerate, rehabilitate, reinvigorate, rekindle, remedy, renew, restore, restore to life, resurrect, revivify, renovate, revitalize, revive
See also: cure, recall, remedy, renew, restore, resurrect
References in periodicals archive ?
They were specifically instructed to adjust their resuscitation metrics based on feedback provided by the accelerometer.
One is recommending an electronic cardiac (EC) monitor to assess heart rate during resuscitation instead of relying on pulse oximetry, and the other is no longer recommending routine tracheal suction in nonvigorous babies with meconium-stained fluid, he told attendees at the American Academy of Pediatrics annual meeting.
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was applied to 74(23%) patients for <20 minutes and to 247(76.9%) for more than 20 minutes.
The duration of time from injury to surgical control of bleeding is an important factor in the appropriateness of applying hypotensive resuscitation strategies.
For example, while the role of team leader is discussed in the 2011 ACLS Provider Manual (Sinz, Navarro, Soderberg, & Callaway, 2011), roles of other team members in cardiac resuscitation are not.
Nurses are the biggest group of health practitioners in New Zealand, and are often first on the scene at a resuscitation. We have a responsibility to provide essential assessment and care--and often, continuing interventions, to these patients in critical conditions.
Even though paediatrics became a specialty in 1930, it was only from the 1970s that paediatricians, and later neonatologists, became actively involved with the care of newborns and their resuscitation. By the 1980s, resuscitation guidelines had been drawn up in the UK and the USA, and there was active training of doctors and midwives in newborn resuscitation.
The megacode simulation was open to any health care worker, including non-professional staff such as porters and health care assistants who often serve critical roles in resuscitation. The session was attended by a total of 48 participants and 12 trainers from across the province of Manitoba and from Northwestern Ontario (NWO).
* HCPs believe the risks or concerns associated with FPDR include violation of patient confidentiality, concerns that witnessing a resuscitation would have long-lasting adverse psychological effects on family members; family presence would cause stress, nervousness, and distraction to the HCPs during the event; family members may misinterpret the team's activities; and family member's might initiate future litigation (medicolegal concerns).
This experimental study compared results of two ACLS classes on measures of knowledge (content exam) and resuscitation skills (performance exam).
Research studies conducted with regard to the opinions of health professionals have showed that those approving of family presence said that it helped relatives to see the effort of the resuscitation team and that everything that could have been done had been done, which may lower the risk of litigation surrounding the resuscitation.[5] Another idea was that it facilitated the grieving process, gave family members the opportunity to say goodbye, and promoted the family's acceptance of the death of their loved one.
Fluids administered to achieve those goals in birds include crystalloids, colloids, and whole blood, (1,4,8) but, to our knowledge, only one previous study (4) attempted to compare outcome after resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock with different fluid types in birds, including a crystalloid, a colloid, and a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier solution (HBOCS).