retardation


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She said that such cases are common and can only be managed and not cured."Mental retardation is a situation where children salivate on themselves uncontrollably and exhibit funny characters but are not brutal as compared to those with mental illnesses.
Under the conditions of our study, use of visual aids as a learning tool for children with mild mental retardation resulted an improvement in underhand volleyball Serve.
For some WBS patients on the contrary, growth retardation is severe.
A study was conducted to investigate job satisfaction among 35 male and female teachers of students with mental retardation and 300 male and female teachers working in public education sector.9 The data were collected on a fifty-item scale containing five major factors including satisfaction with one's monthly pay, satisfaction of teachers' needs, the nature of work and general environment in the school, the kind of administration and the social position.
Cases with known history of CNS malformation, like meningitis, encephalitis, obvious malformations like hydrocephalus and recognized syndromes, known to cause developmental delay/ mental retardation were excluded from the study.
Studies support low socioeconomic status association with mild mental retardation. (7, 8) Besides sociodemographic factors, genetic factors, perinatal factors and associated co morbid conditions also influence the severity of MR.
If growth retardation is determined early, it does not lead to permanent changes.
Mental retardation is defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV [10] as 'significantly sub-average general intellectual functioning (having an [intelligence quotient] IQ [less than or equal to]70) that is accompanied by significant limitations in adaptive functioning in at least two of the following skills areas: communication, self-care, home living, social/interpersonal skills, use of community resources, self-direction, functional academic skills, work, leisure, health and safety' The onset must occur before age 18 years.
Joubert syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive transmitted disease characterised by cerebellar and brain stem malformations.1 In classic JS, there are clinical findings such as ataxia, hypotonia, abnormal eye movements, hyperpnoea-apnoea episodes and mental-motor retardation. Radiologically, posterior fossa and brain stem anomalies are seen such as cerebellar vermian dysgenesis, expanded 4th ventricle, and thickened strained superior cerebellar peduncle.2 Patients with JS may have varying clinical and radiological views.
In 2002, the United States Supreme Court decided Atkins, holding that imposition of the death penalty for defendants with mental retardation violates the Eighth Amendment prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment.
After the Georgia State Board of Pardons and Parole refused to commute Hill's sentence to life without parole in July 2012, one of the three psychiatrists who originally said the prisoner did not meet the criteria for mental retardation contacted Kammer to say he was concerned about his previous diagnosis.
Retardation factor and characteristic impedance expressions at low frequencies can be obtained from (1) and (2)