retire

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retire

v. 1) to stop working at one's occupation. 2) to pay off a promissory note, and thus "retire" the loan. 3) for a jury to go into the jury room to decide on a verdict after all evidence, argument and jury instructions have been completed.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
* The principles for developing a sound reform plan to lower overall costs of federal retiree health coverage;
Depending on the number of years they have rendered, the retirees will receive
Under the GSIS retirement program, government retirees get a monthly pension that's equivalent to 80 percent of their average monthly salary (AMS) during the last three preceding years of service prior to retirement, while retirees from the private sector under the SSS retirement program who made 120 monthly contributions get a monthly pension of P300, plus 20 percent of the AMS credit for the 10 preceding years of service prior to retirement, and another 2 percent of the AMS in excess of 10 years, as the basis for computing the monthly pension of SSS retirees.
The retirees pointed out that the automatic deductions from their monthly pensions are being affected by the PNP through its Automatic Pension Deduction Scheme and are made in favor of PNP-accredited Multi-Purpose Cooperatives (MPCs) and Savings and Loans Associations (SLAs).
In conclusion, BlackRock and EBRI say, “shifting demographics and a more challenging market environment will only elevate the complexity and importance of helping retirees maximize the value of retirement savings.” If future retirees save more and work with an adviser, however, they can overcome these obstacles, the researchers say.
Retirees are encouraged to start or expand businesses given that the economy has enjoyed a 6.9 percent growth rate, Chy said.
Medicare Advantage plans provide high value because they include additional benefits to improve retiree health and manage cost (as compared to original Medicare).
"The data show workers are still more likely to expect retiree health benefits than retirees are actually likely to have those benefits, but the expectations gap is closing," says EBRI Director Paul Fronstin, who co-authored the study.
For decades, Visteon and its predecessors provided health and insurance benefits to the company's retirees. The most recent summary plan descriptions (SPD) at both plants said that retiree medical coverage will "continue during retirement" or "continue during retirement until death." However, the second page of the SPDs reserved for the company the right to "suspend, modify or amend the plan or even to terminate the plan" at any time.
Industry analysts said that in practice, each municipality in the state pledges to pay its own retiree health obligations.
The retirees made the appeal an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Lagos, claiming that there had been a delay in processing the benefits.