retranslate

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Self-translation refers to the "historicist" act of retranslating one's own translation, and this recycling considers and reconsiders the translator's own professional ego.
As Cheyfitz would say, she is retranslating it into something useful for the dominated people.
After Willa's death, Jane "completes" the manuscript, offering her own annotations and retranslating its final pages.
1) The values in parentheses are from running once, then retranslating with the run-time feedback from the first run; this gave a significant performance difference only for the programs shown.
industry, government, and research organizations the time and cost of retranslating articles, patents, conference papers, technical reports, and other documents that have already been translated by other contributing institutions, and, especially, to share this technical information as widely as possible.
The decline in the cash balance was primarily due to the impact of retranslating the Company's international currency positions into U.
In this article, I explore what teaching Lutheran doctrines in a mission context means and entails by looking at how Lutherans in mission contexts (3) could regard Luther and his teachings as inspirational, the impacts of translating and retranslating the Lutheran doctrinal statements and confessions into the contextual realities, and the development of a contextualized Lutheran identity through coram doctrine.
The fourth is part of a project that envisages retranslating the entire Mahabharata, thus duplicating the longstanding University of Chicago project.
At the heart of modernity is a facing up to the enigmatic nature of existence, and so the subject of this book is Baudelaire's resultant 'dark sayings' (as Ward calls them, retranslating Saint Paul in I Corinthians 13.
As a linguist, Enrico has spent years re-eliciting, editing, and retranslating the Swanton stories, which his book features in a bilingual format.
By retranslating the term as "entrusted to" rather than as "supplied by," Aperghis identifies among the non-ration texts, in addition to the transfers between storehouses, a new category: receipts for commodities supplied directly to storehouses by producers.
Perhaps I can prove this by retranslating the title poem as my reviewer's contribution to understanding this little volume.