revolt

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revolt

noun agitation, apostasy, change of sides, contrariety, counteraction, defection, defectio, defiance, desertion, disobedience, dissension, faithlessness, insubordination, insurgency, insurrection, motus, mutiny, noncompliance, opposition, outbreak, overthrow, overturn, political upheaval, rebellion, recalcitrance, revolution, rising, secession, seditio, sedition, strife, strike, subversion, tergiversation, tumultus, uprising
See also: battle, conflict, contest, defect, defiance, disagree, disloyalty, disobey, dispute, disturbance, fight, infidelity, insurrection, mutiny, outbreak, outburst, overthrow, protest, rebel, rebellion, reject, rejection, repel, resistance, revolution, riot, secede, sedition, strike, subversion, treason

REVOLT, crim. law. The act of congress of April 30, 1790, s. 8, 1 Story's L. U. S. 84, punishes with death any seaman who shall lay violent hands upon his commander, thereby to hinder or prevent his fighting in defence of his ship, or goods committed to his trust, or shall make a revolt in the ship. What is a revolt is not defined in the act of congress nor by the common law; it was therefore contended, that it could not be deemed an offence for which any person could be punished. 1 Pet. R. 118.
     2. In a case which occurred in the circuit court for the eastern district of Pennsylvania, the defendants were charged with an endeavour to make a revolt. The judges sent up the case to the supreme court upon a certificate of division of opinion of the judges; as to the definition of the word revolt. 4 W. C. C. R. 528. The opinion of the supreme court was delivered by Washington, J., and is in these words "This case comes before the court upon a certificate of division of the opinion of the judges of the circuit court for the eastern district of Pennsylvania, upon the following point assigned by the defendants as a reason in arrest of judgment, viz. that the act of congress does not define the offence of endeavoring to make a revolt; and it is not competent to the court to give a judicial definition of an offence heretofore unknown.
     "This court is of opinion that although the act of congress does not define this offence, it is nevertheless, competent to the court to give a judicial definition of it. We think that the offence consists in the endeavor of the crew of a vessel, or any one or more of them, to overthrow the legitimate authority of her commander, with intent to remove him from his command; or against his will to take possession of the vessel by assuming the government and navigation of her; or by transferring their obedience from the lawful commander to some other person." 11 Wheat. R. 417. Vide 4 W. C. C. R. 528, 405; Mason's R. 147 4 Mason, R. 105; 4 Wash. C. C. R. 548 1 Pet. C. C. R. 213; 5 Mason, R. 464; 1 Sumn. 448; 3 Wash. C. C. R. 525; 1 Carr. & Kirw. 429.
     3. According to Wolff, revolt and rebellion are nearly synonymous; he says it is the state of citizens who unjustly take up arms against the prince or government. Wolff, Dr. de la Nat. 1232.

References in periodicals archive ?
As Oostindie acknowledges in the first chapter, the slave revolt of 1795 connects past and present and is central in the modern-day Curagaoan discourse on nation-building.
In order to analyse how a revolt effect can stay for more or less long time, we adapted the model so that when such revolt effect appears we study the evolution in slow form, with transitions in shorter steps ([DELTA] t = 5).
Urbainczyk discusses the role of the leader, the ideology of the slaves, and finally slave revolts in ancient historiography.
The revolts were predominantly urban and rarely pitted one social group against another.
Cutting across social classes, revolts accepted leaders from all levels of society, including peasants and low-wage manual workers who conspired alongside, but not necessarily under the command of, burghers, merchants, knights, and nobles.
Unlike the other Andean rebellions of the 1780s, the Tomas Katari revolt mainly resulted in attacks here and there, not massive warfare.
Between about 1650 and 1860 there were at least 485 collective acts of violent rebellion, including 392 shipboard revolts and 93 "attacks from the shore by apparently 'free' Africans against ships or longboats," says Richardson, an economic historian at the University of Hull, in Great Britain.
The 1936 revolt forced the Arabs to confront head-on the British plans for Palestine and the prestigious position Zionism held in Britain and Europe in general.
She chooses to examine the context in which slave revolts took place and then the ways in which supporters of slavery used the events to bolster the national identity of white male superiority and in which antislavery advocates used the events to disrupt that national identity.
While Bouve, like Tiernan, emphasizes "the irrational and arbitrary nature of cultural signs" as they functioned in the context of nineteenth-century Virginia, Their Shadows Before seems to take a more radical stance on the revolt.
American Slave Revolts and Conspiracies: A Reference Guide
slave revolts and abolitionism; a debate with Joao Pedro Marques.