comment

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Related to rheme: theme

comment

n. a statement made by a judge or an attorney during a trial which is based on an alleged fact, but not a proven fact. Properly, if made in the presence of the jury, the jurors should be reminded it is not evidence, and it should not be considered, but how can a juror forget? The old adage: "a bell once rung, cannot be unrung," applies.

comment

noun animadversion, annotation, averment, censeo, clarification, commentary, dictum, elucidation, enucleation, example, exegesis, explanation, explanatory note, explication, exposition, expounding, expression, finding, footnote, gloss, illustration, interpretation, marginal annotation, mention, notation, note, note of explanation, observation, postulate, reflection, remark, report, scholium, statement, utterance, word of explanation
Associated concepts: comment on defendant's failure to testify, comment on evidence, comment on witness' creddbility, comment upon the testimony, comments on the weight of evidence

comment

verb allege, animadvert, annotate, assert, bring out, censere, clarify, clear, criticize, declare, define, descant, dilate upon, discourse upon, discuss, elucidate, enucleate, exemplify, expand on, explain, explicate, exposit on, expound, express, give a sense to, gloss, illustrate, interject, interpose, interpret, make clear, make notes, make observations, make remarks, mention, note, notice, observe, opine, pass on, point out, posit, put a meaning on, rationalize, remark, remark upon, render intelligible, reprove, review, say, sententiam dicere, shed light upon, spell out, state, touch upon, treat, utter
Associated concepts: comment on defendant's failure to tessify, comment on evidence, comment on witness' credibillty, comment upon the testimony, comments on the weight of evidence, prosecutor's comments on evidence
See also: communicate, construction, convey, discourse, discuss, express, interject, mention, muse, notation, note, notice, observation, observe, phrase, pronouncement, reference, remark, review, statement
References in periodicals archive ?
5 [as cited in McCarthy, 1991]) In the example we can easily identify I as the theme or topic of conversation and in Rue Martel, Paris known as the complement or rheme of the topic.
This was achieved due to training the learners through the program on the pragmatic steps represented in specifying sentence components, theme and rheme, and determining the pragmatic function of each (Hirama, 2011); determining the function of the transition element in the sentence; and then considering the four pragmatic functions which are: the theme, the tail, the topic, and the focus (Forstan, 2013).
Now, since in never figures in declarative non-verbal clauses (they are always marked by some kind of modality when lu is present), perhaps a better place to look would have been either Izre'el and Cohen 2004: [section]4.1.1.1 or Cohen 2005b; in both la is described precisely--as a modal rheme marker, regardless of element order.
Halliday,1976/8), because it sets up the Theme + Rheme structure in the form of an equation, where Theme = Rheme.
The remainder of the message, the part in which the Theme is developed, is called...the Rheme.
Rheme. Import Sourcing Decision Making: Swedish Sourcing from Asian Low Cost Countries, paper presented at the 16th IPSERA Conference, Bath, UK, 2007.
(63) Very briefly, according to Prague linguists such as Mathesius and Firbas, the nature of interaction suggests that the usual, unmarked order of message segments is that of theme followed by rheme. (BNC FRL 1448)
Assuming that in addition to the primary theme the rheme could include a secondary theme, Aleksandr Archipov claims that the comitative construction is characterized by joining NPs of different degrees of thematicity.
The reason for this, according to SFL, is that the Textual metafunction organizes each clause as a message into a structure that facilitates the exchange of information by separating each clause into two parts the Theme (i.e., what the clause is about, what its starting point is) and the Rheme (i.e., the main body of the message).
Major concerns of twentieth-century linguistics, such as the gap between langue and parole (in Saussure's terms) or between 'rheme' and narrative (to use Peirce's) (or indeed, between competence and performance, to say it with Chomsky, who is unfortunately not really a presence in the volume) discussions of how grammar as system historically failed to account for the variety of language in use, and the problems of phonetic symbolism (e.g.
Then the principal accent, called the RHEME, occurs on what Bolinger calls the point of maximum interest.